Ed Reed

Safety

Ed Reed

12 Seasons
174 Games
2004 Defensive Player of the Year
2000s NFL All Decade Team
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12

Seasons

174

Games

2004

Defensive Player of the Year

2000s

NFL All Decade Team
View full stats

“Football is the ultimate team sport…color didn't matter to do the things we've done.  Not one player on the football field can do it without the other ten guys. There is no GOAT. There is no greatest of all players…It's impossible to say that. Stats don't matter.”

Read Ed Reed's Bio

(Miami - Florida)...5'11'', 200...Drafted 1st round (24th overall) in 2002 NFL Draft by Baltimore Ravens ... Exuded excellence on field ... quickly became one of the most accomplished safeties ... started all 16 games as rookie ... Named All-Pro six times ... 2004 NFL Defensive Player of the Year ... Born September 11, 1978 in St. Rose, Louisiana

BIO

Ed Reed Baltimore Ravens & Houston Texans & New York Jets

“Football is the ultimate team sport…color didn't matter to do the things we've done.  Not one player on the football field can do it without the other ten guys. There is no GOAT. There is no greatest of all players…It's impossible to say that. Stats don't matter.”

The Baltimore Ravens selected Ed Reed out of the University of Miami (Fla.) in the first round, 24th overall, of the 2002 NFL Draft. Over the next 12 seasons, Reed exuded excellence on the field and quickly became one of the most accomplished safeties in the league.

Reed started all 16 games during his rookie season and became a vital member of the Ravens’ dominant defense. In his first professional season, he logged 85 tackles (71 solo), five interceptions, 12 passes defensed, one sack and one fumble recovery. He led Baltimore in interceptions as a rookie and seven of his eleven seasons with the club.

From 2006-2012, Reed helped lead the Ravens defensive that was vital to four AFC North Division titles, three AFC championship game appearances and one Super Bowl championship.

While the Ravens fell short in both 2008 and 2011, in 2012 they blazed through the playoffs and defeated the New England Patriots 28-13 in the AFC championship. Baltimore then faced the San Francisco 49ers in Super Bowl XLVII where Reed contributed five tackles, one interception and one pass defensed during a 34-31 victory.

After 11 seasons with the Ravens, Reed was signed by the Houston Texans as a free agent before the 2013 season. He played in seven games with the Texans before finishing that season with the New York Jets. Reed still holds several Ravens team records, including most career interceptions (61), most interceptions in a season (9). He also tops the NFL’s record book for most career interception return yardage (1,590) and the two longest interception returns (107 and 106).

Reed not only posted remarkable stats on the field, he also received the Ravens Ed Block Courage Award in 2008.

In all, Reed played 174 career games and amassed a total of 643 tackles (531 solo), intercepted 64 passes which he returned for 1,590 yards and 7 touchdowns, recorded 6 sacks, and made 13 fumble recoveries.

A nine-time Pro Bowler, Reed was named All-Pro six times and the NFL Defensive Player of the Year in 2004. Reed was also named to the NFL All-Decade Team of the 2000s.

STATS

Ed Reed's Stats

       

Interceptions

 

Sacks

Year

Team

G

No.

Yds.

Avg.

TD

PD

No.

2002

Baltimore

16

5

167

33.0

0

12

1.0

2003

Baltimore

16

7

132

19.0

1

16

1.0

2004

Baltimore

16

9

358

40.0

1

17

2.0

2005

Baltimore

10

1

23

23.0

0

9

0.0

2006

Baltimore

16

5

70

14.0

1

9

0.0

2007

Baltimore

16

7

130

19.0

0

13

0.0

2008

Baltimore

16

9

264

29.0

2

16

1.0

2009

Baltimore

12

3

111

37.0

1

5

0.0

2010

Baltimore

10

8

183

23.0

0

16

0.0

2011

Baltimore

16

3

25

8.0

0

8

1.0

2012

Baltimore

16

4

78

20.0

1

15

0.0

2013

N.Y. Jets

7

3

49

16.0

0

4

0.0

2013

Houston

7

0

0

0.0

0

0

0.0

Career Total

174

64

1590

25.0

7

140

6.0

 

Additional Career Statistics:

Punt Returns: 30-205; Fumble Recovery for TD: 3; Safeties: 1



CHAMPIONSHIP GAMES

Ed Reed's Championship Games

Championship Games

 

2008 AFC – Pittsburgh Steelers 23, Baltimore Ravens 14

Reed started at free safety. He had 2 tackles and 1 pass defensed.

 

2011 AFC – New England Patriots 23, Baltimore Ravens 20

Reed started at free safety. He had 3 tackles, 1 assist and 2 passes defensed.

 

2012 AFC – Baltimore Ravens 28, New England Patriots 13

Reed started at free safety. He had 2 tackles

 

Super Bowls

 

Super Bowl XLVII – Baltimore Ravens 34, San Francisco 49ers 31

Reed started at free safety. He had 5 tackles, 1 interception returned for 6 yards and 1 pass defensed.



CAREER HIGHLIGHTS

Ed Reed's Career Highlights

All-League Teams

           

All-Pro: 2003 (PFWA, SN)  ·  2004 (AP, PFWA, SN)  ·  2006 (AP, PFWA, SN)  · 

   2007 (AP, PFWA, SN, US)  ·  2008 (AP, PFWA, SN)  ·  2010 (AP, PFWA, SN) 

 

All-Pro Second Team: 2003 (AP) ·  2009 (AP)  ·  2011 (AP)        

 

All-AFC: 2003 (PW)  ·  2004 (PW)  ·  2006 (PW)  ·  2007 (PW) ·  2008 (PW) ·  2010 (PW)  · 

               2011 (PW)  

 

Pro Bowls

(9) – 2004, 2005, 2007, 2008, 2009* 2010*, 2011*, 2012*, 2013*

 

* Did not play

           

In the NFL Record Book (at time of his retirement following 2013 season)

  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Career – 1,590
  • [1st] Longest Interception Return – 107 (vs. Philadelphia, Nov. 23, 2008)
  • [Tied for 1st] Most Seasons Leading League in Interceptions – 3 (2004, 2008, 2010)
  • [2nd] Most Interception Return Yardage, Season – 358 (2004)
  • [2nd] Longest Interception Return – 106 (vs. Cleveland, Nov. 7, 2004)
  • [Tied for 2nd] Most Seasons Leading League in Interception Yardage – 2 (2004, 2010)

 

Postseason Records

  • [Tied for 1st] Most Interceptions, Career – 9
  • [Tied for 2nd] Most Consecutive Games with an Interception – 3 (2006, 2008)

 

Pro Bowl Records

  •  [Tied for 1st] Most Interceptions, Game – 2

 

Team Records

Ravens records held by Reed

            (Records through the 2012 season, Reed’s final season with Baltimore)

  • [1st] Most Interceptions, Career – 61
  • [1st] Most Interceptions, Season – 9 (2004, 2008)
  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Career – 1,541
  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Season – 358 (2004)
  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Game – 150 (vs. Philadelphia, Nov. 23, 2008)
  • [1st] Longest Interception Return – 107t (vs. Philadelphia, Nov. 23, 2008)
  • [1st] Most Interception Return TDs, Career – 7
  • [Tied for 1st] Most Interception Return TDs, Season – 2 (2008)
  • [2nd] Highest Interception Return Average, Career – 25.3
  • [2nd] Most Interceptions, Season – 8 (2010)
  • [2nd] Most Interception Return Yardage, Season – 264 (2008)
  • [2nd] Most Interception Return Yardage, Game – 106 (vs. Cleveland, Nov. 7, 2004)
  • [2nd] Longest Interception Return – 106t (vs. Cleveland, Nov. 7, 2004)
  • [2nd] Most Opponents Fumbles Recovered for a TD, Career – 2
  • [Tied for 2nd] Most Safeties, Career – 1
  • [Tied for 2nd] Most Safeties, Season – 1 (2006)
  • [Tied for 2nd] Most Opponents Fumbles Recovered for a TD, Season – 1 (2004, 2008)
  • [3rd] Most Interceptions, Season – 7 (2003, 2007)
  • [3rd] Most Opponents Fumbles Recovered, Career – 10
  • [4th] Most Games Played, Career – 160
  • [4th] Most Interception Return Yardage, Season – 183 (2010)
  • [4th] Most Tackles, Career – 661
  • [Tied for 4th] Most Seasons – 11
  • [5th] Longest Fumble Return – 32 (at Pittsburgh, Dec. 24, 2006)

 

Postseason Records

  • [1st] Most Interceptions, Career – 9
  • [1st] Longest Interception Return – 64t (at Miami, Jan. 4, 2009)
  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Career – 168
  • [1st] Most Interception Return Yardage, Game – 76 (at Miami, Jan. 4, 2009)
  • [Tied for 1st] Most Interceptions, Game – 2 (vs. Indianapolis, Jan. 13, 2007; at Miami, Jan. 4, 2009)
  • [Tied for 1st] Most Interception Return TDs, Career – 1
  • [2nd] Most Games, Career – 15
  • [2nd] Most Interception Return Yardage, Game – 67 (Dawan Landry, 42-yard INT & 25-yard lateral from Ed Reed at New England, Jan. 10, 2010)
  • [2nd] Highest Interception Return Average, Career – 18.7
  • [4th] Most Tackles, Career – 50

 

League/Team Statistical Titles

 

NFL Statistical Championships

Interceptions Titles: 2004, 2008, 2010

 

AFC Statistical Championships

Interceptions Titles: 2003, 2004, 2008, 2010

 

Team Statistical Championships

Interceptions Titles: 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2010, 2012

                                                                                                                                                           

Awards and Honors

  • NFL All-Decade Team of 2000s
  • 2004 Defensive Player of the Year (AP, Football Digest)
  • 2004 Defensive Most Valuable Player (PW)
  • 2004 NFL Player of the Month – November
  • 2008 Ed Block Courage Award
  • 2008 NFL Player of the Month – December
  • 2010 NFL Player of the Month – December

 

Year-by-Year Team Records

2002     Baltimore Ravens................ 7-9-0   (3rd)
2003     Baltimore Ravens............. 10-6-0   (1st)
2004     Baltimore Ravens................ 9-7-0   (2nd)
2005     Baltimore Ravens............... 6-10-0   (3rd)
2006     Baltimore Ravens............. 13-3-0   (1st)
2007     Baltimore Ravens............... 5-11-0   (4th)
2008     Baltimore Ravens............. 11-5-0   (2nd)
2009     Baltimore Ravens............... 9-7-0   (2nd)
2010     Baltimore Ravens............. 12-4-0   (2nd)
2011     Baltimore Ravens............. 12-4-0   (1st)
2012     Baltimore Ravens............. 10-6-0   (1st)
2013     Houston Texans................ 2-14-0   (4th)
2013     N.Y Jets............................. 8-8-0   (2nd)

(Division Finish in Parentheses)

Qualified for Postseason in Bold

CAREER CAPSULE

Ed Reed's Career Capsule

Full Name: Edward Earl Reed, Jr.

Birthdate: September 11, 1978

Birthplace: St. Rose, Louisiana

High School: Destrehan (LA)

Pro Career: 12 seasons, 174 games

Drafted: 1st round (24th player overall) in 2002 by Baltimore Ravens



ENSHRINEMENT SPEECH

Ed Reed Enshrinement Speech

You know, hot as it was, I thought I sweat out all my tears, man.  Got leather seats and sun was right here cooking me.

         (Cheers.) 

         All right, we got ‑‑ we ain't got much time.  No way in Ohio. 

The Athlete's Prayer:  Lord, please clear my head of all distractions and my heart of burdens I may bear so I may perform my very best, knowing You will always be there.  Please lift me up before the moment so through Your eyes I may see and have a clearer understanding as the game unfolds before me.  With great courage I will meet this challenge as You would have me to but keep me humble and remind me that my strength comes from knowing You.  That when all eyes are upon me at the end of this big game, I would turn the eyes to You, O Lord, and the glory of Your name.  Amen. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         I used to read that every day before a game, every Sunday, even in college I read that, because even now the Good Lord, Almighty God, Creator of All Things, all of us, He's the reason why I'm here.  This little light of mine, I had to let it shine.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         I'd like to thank all those that fought for this ‑‑ fought and marched in this great country of ours.  That's the reason why I'm here.  Because, without them, this kid from New Orleans wouldn't make it.

         My Class members, thank you, guys.  Just to be a part of this with you guys, man, it's awesome.  I said Kevin ‑‑ I said Kevin should have been the spokesman for the whole class because he speaks so well, man. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         I think you said it all.  You know, I really don't think none of us need to say anything, man.  We can go to parties right now.

         (Laughter.)

         It's fitting to being here with Mr. Johnny Robinson and Ty and Champ because my DB's know it was always about us first.  So, I'm honored, Mr. Robinson, and Louisiana boys.  Yes, sir.

         (Cheers and applause.)   

         Thanks to the Pro Football Hall of Fame, all the volunteers.  I mean, 5,000 volunteers.  You all are doing a great job this week.  Awesome time. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         Mr. Blair Buswell, I mean, I look just like the guy.

         (Laughter.)

         Now, I had braids all week.  I had to take it out, you know.  It's football time, y'all. 

         To you, the fans, thank you for your support.

         (Cheers and applause.)

         You the guys that make it fun for us.  I mean all of us.  Even the players out there.  You the guys that make it fun for us.  And, I mean, you pay the bills.  You know?  So thank you.

         NFL changed my life.  It put me in a place I never thought I would be.  Thanks to Houston Texans for letting me be there for a couple months.

         (Laughter.)

         Appreciate that light yap. 

         (Laughter.)

         Thanks to the Jets, where I finished off at, but there's no place like Baltimore!

         (Cheers and applause.)

         No place like Baltimore, baby.  I'd like to thank that organization:  Steve Bisciotti; Ozzie Newsome; Coach Belichick, his staff; Coach Harbs, his staff.  There's too many people to mention.  I know I'm going to miss some people, man, but I love all y'all guys, man.  Thank you for your support over the years.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         Even now.  I know we had a lot of conversations, Steve and I, Ozzie and I.  Man, we've had a lot of little bumps and bruises.  Coach Harbs, my guy.  That man there, man, he came in with a plan, and we executed it, Coach.  Iron sharpens iron.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         To all my teammates, I mean from high school to college to the pros, man, thank all you guys because I wouldn't be here without you guys.  I always say there's no GOAT in this game because none of us can do this without our teammates.  There's no GOAT.  Can't be.  It takes all 11 guys on the football field to do what we do. 

         So, thanks to my teammates, man, over the years, especially those DBs, man.  My DB groups, man, we went through sometimes.  We had a bunch of fun times playing this game, but it was a lot of studying.  And I appreciate the trust you guys put in me as a leader.  So, I really appreciate that.

         You've got to excuse me.  I just wrote this all right here sitting in this chair.

         (Laughter.)

         It's been special.  This has been a great ride.  I mean, you know, it's hard to prepare for something that, you know, you just really want to soak in.  You know, I really just wanted to soak everything in, even today with the parade, man, the fans out there.  It was amazing.  Ohio, the state, the city of Canton, you guys really put out for us and show out for us.  So, I really thank you for that. 

         I got to pay homage and respect to all the greats up here.  You guys, man, I looked up to a lot of you guys, especially Ronnie Lott.  He's the reason why I did a lot of things.  On the football field, I wanted to be like him, the woo hitter of all times.  I know he told me I was the best safety to ever do it, but I got all ten fingers, man, you know.  So, Ronnie, you the man, man. 

         (Laughter.)

         To J.O., my boy, teammate, Hall of Famer. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         That smile, you know what I'm talking about.  Yes, sir.  That man kept a smile on his face, no doubt.  Five two.  Back‑to‑back. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         Never been done. 

         The guy that changed my life, brother for life, in Rohan Marley.  When I get to that other guy, he know who I'm talking about at Kappa with that cane. 

         Oh, man.  This is tough.  This is real tough, y'all.  This kid wasn't supposed to be here.  Before it gets tough, man, my mom and my dad, my first coaches.  My brothers Darion, my brother Brian, rest in peace to you.  He passed when I was playing this game.  My family.  My Uncle Tim. 

         My son.  My son's mother, Zakia Funchess, thank you for your support, for your stability, just holding us together as a team, you know, and taking care of our son when I was away and you were by yourself.  Thank you for that.  I appreciate you for allowing me to follow my dreams.

         Just last week, man, leading up to this, this is why this got hard and I couldn't really do what I wanted to do is because my auntie got sick, and she in the hospital.  She couldn't make it, and she ain't got much longer.  It's tough, y'all.  Whoo.  It's fun, though.  I love it, man.  It's joy, now.  It's joy.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         I'm going to get through this.  Oh, man, my Auntie Ruthie.  To my Aunt Dootie, the Jackson family, Mr. Pop, my great‑grandmother, Helen Sanchez, and teammates that passed along the way, Mickey Wilson, Chris Campbell, Al Blades, and the late great Sean Taylor who should be a Hall of Famer.

         (Cheers and applause.)   

         That's why I can start getting to it a little bit, y'all.  Whew.  You know, mental illness is one of the biggest problems in our world.  You know, it's the ill mentality that really kills us. 

         So, I got to send prayers to the families that has experienced the mass shootings in the last couple days.  I think it was yesterday, I'm not sure, but just in general across this country.  It's something we really need to address

         (Applause.)

         Y'all could have told me my nose is running up here.  Coach?  Help me out, Coach. 

         Our standard as a team was about being together, one goal, making each other better, for all to achieve their personal goals.  So, I ask America: What's our standard?  Your environment is key.  The company you keep matters.  Accountability.  That's all you have.  Each one of us push each other towards their own achievements, ultimately just to take care of our families, take care of our own. 

         And that's what we need to do, help each other, encourage each other, lift each other up.  But God don't make no mistakes, y'all.  This is not about me.  It's about a lot of people over here and out here.  Thank you.

         It's really all about the positive progress of my parents.  It's funny how things go full circle.  You see, my dad lived in St. Rose, where from, where I grew up.  My dad went to Destrehan High school; left there because of bad structure and the environment wasn't helpful to African Americans at the time. 

         So, he went moved to Shrewsbury, where I was born and raised.  And if he don't move to Shrewsbury, he don't meet my mom, who he's been married to for 41 years. 

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         See, my dad was a super athlete.  He did everything.  And his teammates who he played softball with, you know, they remind me all the time, especially my godfather ‑‑ see if I can do this ‑‑ I can hear him saying it: ‘ Hey, Godchild, you're good, but you're not as good as your daddy.  That's where you get it, boy.  Love you, Godchild.’

         (Laughter.)

         I love you, Uncle Box.  I was raised in Shrewsbury, and my parents lived in a one‑bedroom apartment.  And it was all about progressing.  Really, they moved from one‑bedroom apartment to another one‑bedroom apartment with four brothers ‑‑ with three ‑‑ with four boys.  And then when my youngest brother Edwin was born, we moved to a two‑bedroom apartment.  And then all that was within two streets, y'all.  Wasn't going very far, but they were progressing.

         And we finally moved to St. Rose, and we got a house, four bedrooms, and that's where it really began for me, when I got ‑‑ when I arrived to St. Rose and I went to Albert Cammon ‑‑ that's one person in here for me ‑‑ got one of us back there. 

         But we moved to St. Rose, and I had some great friends, man, who played a lot of football, a lot of them I can't name, but Aaron Smith, Russell Pickham. Me and Russell Pickham used to throw the ball to each other nights like this 60, 50 yards away from each other, y'all.  That's why I caught so many interceptions.  Thank you, bro.  Love you, man. 

         (Applause.) 

         See, parents, your job as a parent is to provide a nurturing environment for your child to grow up, raise them to leave the house, not to stay.  Don't want no kids at 30 and 40 years old putting their name on the milk. 

         (Laughter.) 

         And I mean really be parents, y'all.  I mean, I love this lyric from Michael Jackson.  He said:  ‘If you can't feed the baby, then don't have the baby.’  That's true, kids.  Don't have a baby if you can't afford them.  I hear one crying right now, so that's ‑‑ that's an amen. 

         (Laughter.)

         To my son ‑‑ my son, my nephews and nieces, I love y'all.  No matter what, keep your head up, keep going, and keep growing.  You got all the support from me.  Son, I love you, man.  You're my heart, dude.  You're gonna get there, man.  Just put your mind on it.

         (Applause.)

         See, I know and I knew what it means.  I knew when I know what it means when you see us, see me.  I had to grow up fast, y'all.  I had to mature real fast because of my environment.

         It was crime‑infested, drugs, police, all kind of things going on.  It wasn't always bad policing like people think.  No, everybody's not ‑‑ everybody's not bad. 

         There's just one police officer that was in my neighborhood.  I won't say his name.  People know.  And this was in Shrewsbury when I was growing up.  And we was always taught to run from the police and dodge the police officers.  And I remember this one time I'm yelling back to my cousins, because most of them was selling drugs or something, that the police was coming.

         And a police officer heard me.  And he called me to his car, and he said, ‘Come in, young man.  Get in the back.’  I lost it, y'all.  He said, Where do you live?  I said, around the corner, one‑bedroom house.  And he was like, ‘I'm taking you home.’  I was like, ‘Oh, my god.  Don't do that.  Take me to jail.  Cause my mama's home.’

         (Laughter.)

         But I can remember him saying, ‘Son, I know you.  I see you around here playing sports.  So, you don't need to be hanging with those other kids and other guys because you have something.’  So, I would say to the point of what we have going on in our society, don't aggravate or, should I say, push an officer to have to do something they don't have to have to ‑‑ shouldn't have to do.

         (Applause.) 

         We all are human beings.  Just make it home, man.  Take your ticket and go.  Just take that slap on the wrist and get arrested.  See, I grew up in St. Rose, and on my way to school I passed up three plantations.  So, I really had to grow up fast, y'all.

         I was a two‑star athlete.  I got looked over.  You got to surround yourself with the right people that supports you.  You have to.  That's the only way you're gonna get here.  And I know a lot of guys up here could say the same thing.  If you don't have the right people in your environment, your peers, your friends to support you, you won't make it, y'all. 

         Kerry Nicholson, Joe Smith, Keith Sterling, man, y'all are my boys, man.  Without y'all, I wouldn't be here.  Thanks for holding me down.

         (Applause.) 

         So, I say that to kids:  Make sure you have the right people around you.  Make sure you surround yourself with the right folk.  Because, if you don't, there's an old saying:  You show me your friends, I'll tell you who you are.  You quickly become the things that you feed and the things that you hang around. 

         So, I made the choice not to hang around people who were selling drugs.  I made a choice not to hang around guys who wasn't going to school.  And I met Mr. Parquet.  Mr. Parquet still slapped me in my chest to this day.  I've been knowing Mr. Parquet since I was 16 years old.  He's my mentor.  He's here.  He's 80 years old, and he still do the same thing.

         (Applause.)   

         Mr. Parquet, Ms. Parquet, I love you all because I know I wouldn't be here without you.  Hall of Fame mentor, Hall of Fame ‑‑ Hall of Famer Mr. Parquet, no doubt.  Love you, Mr. P.

         (Applause.)

         Like I told y'all, I just wrote this.  None of my ‑‑ my guy's like, what is he doing up there?  It's hard.  Real hard, man.  I want to make sure I get everything in. 

         So I went to Albert Cammon.  Mr. Parquet took me to Destrehan High School, and I met Ms. Hall, the secretary of the high school.  She was mentoring a bunch of kids as well.  Ms. Hall took me under her wing because I needed that wing.  She's a guardian angel, her and her husband, Knipper Hall. 

         I lived with them when I was in high school after asking my parents can I move away.  Five minutes away, y'all.  Just a walk.  It wasn't far. 

         (Laughter.)

         And I moved into Ms. Hall’s house because I needed a different environment.  I didn't feel like where I was at was going to help me achieve a goal that I wanted to do, and that was just go to college, because we couldn't afford to pay for me to go to college. 

         And the University of Miami came on, came along, and Chuck Pagano and Curtis Johnson started recruiting me, and all he told me was to get the grades.  And, Ms. Hall, I know you remember today on those steps getting that ACT back, and I made the grade, and I became a Hurricane.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         Chuck Pagano, man, this guy here taught me just about everything what it is to know about being a defensive back, and I took it to the next level because he was like a father to me, him and CJ, Curtis Johnson, both coaches in the NFL right now.  That's how I know your coaching matters.  That's why you hear guys up here talking about their coaching. 

         These guys took me and Reggie Wayne from Louisiana.  Reggie will be up here soon.  I know he will.  He's nominated next year.  I love you, bro.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         You're the only one that can relate.  I know this.  We've been through some times, man.  I love you, man.  We lost our brothers together, man.  You're my bro.  You was always like the big brother.  Even when I didn't pay the light bill.  Couldn't believe it.  We're just gonna light these candles and stay here, huh?  And we did.  And we rode it out. 

         We rebuilt them.  We rebuilt that orange and green, bro.  We won that national championship when he left.  Like no other man, that Hurricane team there, all my teammates in college, I know a bunch of y'all here.  Ain't gonna ask y'all to stand up because I know y'all tired.  But, man, know I love you guys.  That was a special run.  We were undefeated.  I know they say we could've beat some NFL teams, but I played in this league, it wasn't gonna happen.

         (Laughter.) 

         I would not disrespect this league.  Not even those Cincinnati Bengals. 

         (Cheers and jeers.) 

         Hold up.  Hold on.  Hold on.  Or the Cleveland Browns.

         (Laughter.)

         Now, hold on.  Don't boo me.  Can I get an O‑H?  I have the utmost respect for both of those organizations.  I have 30 picks between the two teams. 

         (Laughter.) 

         Not my fault y'all changed quarterbacks, man.  So, from a Hurricane to a Raven I became.

         (Cheers and applause.)

         I can remember showing up my rookie year in Baltimore, and I had on a Jim Brown jersey.  And Jim Brown was like ‑‑ I mean, he the best, man.  Come on.  It's a throwback jersey.  I show up, and Baltimore booed me.  Just like Cleveland just did it.  Baltimore booed me.  I tried to make up for that, Cleveland.  And I walk onstage, and they're like, ‘Take it off!  Take it off!’  I took it off.  And y'all love me ever since, man.  I love you. 

         Baltimore, I love that city.  Y'all the reason why I did it so hard, man, why I gave so much on that football field because I work my foundation that I built from Baltimore, worked with one of the best and worst schools in the country, y'all, Booker T. Washington. 

         I love my kids.  They're the reason why I went so hard, you know, because they were some of the kids where the riots happened, if y'all remember that, when Freddie Gray passed. 

         And these kids just don't have that same structure that I talked about my dad didn't have, the opportunity, and we're in 2019.  My dad was back in 19 ‑‑ late '50s.  Well, late '60s.  I won't make you that old, Dad.  Late '60s and '70s.

         And, you know, I visit this school, and these kids just don't have the structure in their environment.  And that's all I'm talking about here tonight, is the environment, the structure that you need around you to be successful. 

         These kids don't have that.  So when I got to Baltimore, I took over James Trapp's program, and I've been a part of that program for 17 years and still work with that school.

         (Applause.)

         I love Booker T.  Love Baltimore. 

         (Cheers.) 

         To all my equipment managers, thank you.  Will, A. Carol.  Thank you, guys.  All the Hurricane equipment guys.  Bill T., our trainer and staff, thank you.  Monte Sanders, my trainer in Baltimore, thank you. 

         And while I'm mentioning trainers, Andreu Swasey, I know you're here, man.  I love you, brother.  You're the reason, man, I became the leader I was in Miami and in the league.  And all my chaplains, I thank you, too.

         O.J. Brigance.  If y'all don't know O.J. Brigance, y'all need to know his story because, just like I'm not supposed to be up here, he's not supposed to be on God's earth right now, he's supposed to be in heaven according to the doctor.  But he's right there.  He was diagnosed with ALS.

         (Cheers and applause.) 

         And this man never changed one time.  Juice, you still the same person.  I know it, man.  And I know what you're saying Uncle Earl, keep on going.  Take your time.  I love you, Juice.  You're the reason why I'm here, man.  You're the reason I became a great professional.  Because I remember you making me talk to all the rookies when they came in.  So, thank you for that, Juice.  Love you. 

         (Applause.) 

         Playing this game, it's a violent game, if y'all play this game.  A lot of guys up here know that.  It's a very violent game, and y'all should know that as parents if you got your kids in it.  I have my kids in it, and best believe I would do it again because I love this game. 

         But you need to know that you have to take care of your body.  You have to eat right.  You have to sleep good at night, you know, do countless amounts of ice tub, get all the treatment.

         So, I wouldn't be able to do this without my doctor, Clayton Gibson.  Doc, man, I love you, man, for all you provide for me, man.  You let me know it's about life.  You're my mentor, my brother in Christ, my master.  Thank you, brother, for leading me to be a better man these days.

         (Applause.) 

         I know it don't look like it, but I do get haircuts.  So, I got to thank my barbers.  They've been with me for a long time, and they're both named Joe.  Ain't that something?  So, thank you, guys.  Man, I appreciate your support.  Y'all see me, I'd rather be smoking a cigar right now, just chillin', taking my time.  I'm not gonna be up here longer. 

         I grew up in Shrewsbury.  My dad moved us to St. Rose.  I went off to college in Miami and landed in Baltimore, now in Atlanta, and now I'm in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

         (Cheers and applause.)

         I want to represent y'all teammates right, man.  That's all I plan to do.  That Nitschke meeting was everything to me, that luncheon.  You guys are too funny, too, man.  Sitting with Michael Irvin, Warren Sapp in the back talking whole loud all day long.  My big brother Lou schooling me the whole time and sitting there with some of the greats. 

         I'm looking at Emmitt Smith, Cris Carter.  We're in there talking about "Night Train" Layne, "Mean" Joe Greene over there.  I'm like, man, this is awesome, man.  My man Kurt Warner.  Kurt sent me a book when my brother passed, man.  I love you, man, for that.  I still have that book. 

         I'm just honored to be amongst you guys, man, talking with Mel Blount.  You know Warren I've been knowing for a long time.  My uncle Andre Reed.  Got Reeds in here.  We got two Reeds in here, man. 

         I'm just happy to be here, y'all.  I won't take up much more of y'all time, man, because, like I said, it wasn't about me.  That guy just played football, just like a kid did.  It's a kids' game we play.  Truly is.  It don't change.  That's why I made the plays I did, because it was just that simple.

         All I really wanted to do was provide for my family, because we didn't have.  We didn't have instruction; we didn't have the environment.  So, I just wanted to provide for my family, and I was able to do that.  Thank God for the NFL.  Thank God for this game. 

         Thank God for my parents, my mother who hold us down.  I can still hear that broom swinging at me.  My mama was the disciplinarian in the household.  My dad didn't say much.  But when he had to say it, oh, Lord.  Didn't want to hear it, man.

         My brother, Wendell Sanchez, I love you, bro.  You're a Hall of Famer, man.  You know that.  He was the first person to give me a football and told me to try to get past him.  And he's four years older than me, and I was five.  So, I always wanted to play football with you, bro.  I never got the chance, man, but I love you, bro.  I represent you and all my other brothers.  I love you all. 

         This here is for my own Aunt Toot that y'all do not know ‑‑ she passed a long time ago ‑‑ for my uncle Antoine, for my uncle Derrick, that they couldn't walk, they couldn't talk.  They just was here on this earth, and they had to be taken care of 24/7 365 for their whole lives.  So, I just wanted to change our family for them, do something different. 

         There was a lot of things that helped get me through this, I mean, from Def Comedy Jam to hip hop.  So many things helped me get to this place, so many people.  I really just appreciate all the support over the years from all of you guys just loving the game, and even the boos.  I loved it all.  I loved it all, especially when I heard that "Reed" in M&T Bank Stadium. 

         (Collective "Reed...")

         What I wouldn't give for one more interception.  So, to my Hall of Famers, make no mistake, there's a message from God:  There will be another football game when we get there.  I don't know who gonna be starting.  I don't mind coming off the bench, Ronnie. 

         (Laughter.)

         But there will be another game.  This ain't over. 

         I'll leave y'all with this.  I think I took up enough of y'all time.  I'm just grateful just to be here because this kid from Shrewsbury, Louisiana, born in Charity Hospital in New Orleans, which is not even there no more after Katrina, I'm not supposed to be here, but by the grace of God, I made it. 

         So, I'll leave you with this because I never compared myself to any other player.  I won't start doing that now.  And you shouldn't compare yourself to anybody else.  And you doggone right, shouldn't worry about the people who don't like you. 

         Everyone has their own greatness, and you reach your own greatness depends on your environment and your structure, company you keep, and your attitude.  There will be good and bad, right and wrong.  Your reaction of choice, good or bad, has consequences that affects you and those around you.  No matter what, encourage those around you and yourself.

         I stayed encouraged.  That guy there, no matter what, was focused.  He stayed encouraged.  There were some hard times, there was a lot of tears, even now.  I tell you, each one of you, stay encouraged.  Encourage each other.  Help somebody.  We should.  We're supposed to.  That's what being a human is about, leaving this place better than we left ‑‑ than we got it.  That's all it's about, y'all.  Man, I love y'all.

         (Applause.) 

         I know I probably forgot a lot of people. 

         (Cheers and applause.)

Thank you, all. I really appreciate it, man. Y’all be blessed. Have a goodnight.

(Cheers and applause.)