2014 Modern-Era nominees

09/12/2013

The complete list of modern-era candidates for the Class of 2014 consists of 126 nominees was announced exclusively during a one-hour special on NFL Network tonight.

First-Year Eligibles
QB: Trent Green | RB: Shaun Alexander, Warrick Dunn | WR: Marvin Harrison | OL: Willie Anderson, Walter Jones | LB: Derrick Brooks, Tedy Bruschi, Willie McGinest, Zach Thomas | DB: Rodney Harrison, Sam Madison, Patrick Surtain |
Coach: Tony Dungy, Jon Gruden, Mike Holmgren

See Photo Gallery of First-Year Eligibles>>>
From the list, that includes 16 first-year eligible candidates, the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee will choose 25 candidates who will advance as semifinalist nominees. The list of 25 semifinalist nominees will be announced in late November. That semifinalist list will be further reduced by a mail ballot to 15 modern-era finalists and announced in early January. 

The Class of 2014 will be selected from the list of the 15 modern-era finalists plus the two senior nominees (former Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders punter Ray Guy and former Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Claude Humphrey) who were selected last month by the Hall of Fame’s Senior Selection Committee.

The actual voting for the Class of 2014 will be conducted at the Pro Football Hall of Fame Selection Committee’s annual meeting, which will be held in New York City on Saturday, Feb. 1, 2014, the day before Super Bowl XLVIII. The election results will be announced at a live announcement show that evening.


LIST OF MODERN-ERA NOMINEES FOR THE CLASS OF 2014




#First-year eligible; *Finalist in 2013


-OFFENSE-


QUARTERBACKS

DREW BLEDSOE – 1993-2001 New England Patriots, 2002-04 Buffalo Bills, 2005-06 Dallas Cowboys
Played in 194 career games during 14-year career. Completed 3,839 of 6,717 pass attempts for 44,611 yards and 251 touchdowns. Named to four Pro Bowls and Second-Team All-AFC twice.

Modern-Era Nominees by the numbers:

 
RANDALL CUNNINGHAM  – 1985-1995 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997-99 Minnesota Vikings, 2000 Dallas Cowboys, 2001 Baltimore Ravens
Named first- or second-team All-Pro four times and selected to play in four Pro Bowls during 16-year career. Racked up 29,979 yards and 201 touchdowns through the air, while adding 4,928 yards and 35 touchdowns on the ground.    

DOUG FLUTIE – 1986 Chicago Bears, 1987-89, 2005 New England Patriots, 1998-2000 Buffalo Bills, 2001-04 San Diego Chargers.
Played in 91 games during 12-year NFL career. Completed 1,177 of 2,151 for 14,715 and 86 touchdowns. Added 1,634 yards and 10 touchdowns rushing on 338 carries. Selected to one Pro Bowl.

#TRENT GREEN – 1997-98 Washington Redskins; 1999-2000, 2008 St. Louis Rams, 2001-06 Kansas City Chiefs, 2007 Miami Dolphins
Battled back from serious knee injuries to play 11 seasons in the NFL, three of which passed for more than 4,000 yards. A two-time Pro Bowler, led the Chiefs to a 13-3 record and the AFC West Division title in 2003.

STEVE MCNAIR – 1995-2005 Houston/Tennessee Oilers/Titans. 2006-07 Baltimore Ravens
Completed 2,733 of 4,544 passes for 31,304 yards and 174 touchdowns during 13-year playing career. Added 3,590 yards and 37 touchdowns on the ground. Selected to two Pro Bowls. Named the NFL’s MVP in 2003.

PHIL SIMMS – 1979-1993 New York Giants
Most Valuable Player of Super Bowl XXI. Completed 2,576 of 4,647 passes for 33,462 yards and 199 touchdowns. Was named first-team All-Pro in 1986 and selected to two Pro Bowls during 14-year career.

RUNNING BACKS

#SHAUN ALEXANDER – 2000-07 Seattle Seahawks, 2008 Washington Redskins
Seahawks all-time TD leader (112) and rushed for 9,453 yards during nine-year career. Named league MVP in 2005 after ran for a league-high 1,880 yards and scored then-NFL record 28 TDs.
 
OTTIS ANDERSON – 1979-1986 St. Louis Cardinals, 1986-1992 New York Giants
MVP of Super Bowl XXV. Named first-team All-Pro and All-NFC once and voted to two Pro Bowls. Rushed for 10,273 yards and 81 touchdowns, and caught 376 passes for 3,062 yards and 5 TDs in 14-season career.

TIKI BARBER
– 1997-2006 New York Giants
Rushed for more than 1,500 yards in each of last three seasons of 10-year career and amassed a career total of 10,449 yards. Added 5,183 yards on 586 receptions. Voted to two Pro Bowls and named All-Pro once.

*JEROME BETTIS – 1993-95 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1996-2005 Pittsburgh Steelers
Played on five division championship teams and member of Super Bowl XL champions. Named All-Pro twice and voted to six Pro Bowls. Rushed for career total of 13,662 yards, fifth most at retirement, and caught 200 passes for 1,449 yards.

LARRY CENTERS – 1990-98 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 1999-2000 Washington Redskins, 2001-02 Buffalo Bills, 2003 New England Patriots
Set then-record for career receptions and receiving yards by a running back that included a single-season record of 101 catches in 1995. Named All-Pro once and voted to three Pro Bowls. Retired with 827 catches for 6,797 yards, and rushed for 2,188 yards on 615 carries in 198 career games.

ROGER CRAIG – 1983-1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991 Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-93 Minnesota Vikings
First player in NFL history to have 1,000 yards rushing and receiving in same season. Named All-Pro once, voted to four Pro Bowls, and won three Super Bowls. Career totals included 8,189 yards rushing and 566 catches for 4,911 yards.

STEPHEN DAVIS – 1996-2002 Washington Redskins, 2003-05 Carolina Panthers, 2006 St. Louis Rams
Rushed for 8,052 yards and scored 65 TDs during 11-season career. Recorded four 1,000-yard seasons over five-season span. Voted to three Pro Bowls and named All-NFC and Second-Team All-Pro in 1999.

TERRELL DAVIS – 1995-2001 Denver Broncos
Recorded four straight 1,000-yard seasons to start career including 2,000-yard season. Named All-Pro and voted to Pro Bowl three straight times. Played on back-to-back Super Bowl champions and was named MVP of Super Bowl XXXII. Picked to the NFL’s All-Decade Team of 1990s.

#WARRICK DUNN – 1997-2001, 2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-07 Atlanta Falcons
Possessed game-breaking speed and quickness as a runner and receiver. Three-time Pro Bowler, ran for 10,967 yards and 510 receptions for 4,443 yards during 12-year career.

EDDIE GEORGE – 1996-2003 Houston/Tennessee Oilers/Titans, 2004 Dallas Cowboys
Rushed for 1,000 yards seven times in nine-season career. In all, rushed for 10,441 yards and scored 68 TDs and 2,227 yards on 268 receptions and 10 touchdowns.

PRIEST HOLMES – 1997-2000 Baltimore Ravens, 2001-05, 2007 Kansas City Chiefs
Set then-NFL record with 27 rushing touchdowns in 2003. In all, rushed for 8,172 yards and scored 86 TDs in 11-season career. Had 339 catches and 8 receiving touchdowns. Named All-Pro and voted to Pro Bowl three straight years.

More on the Selection Process>>>

DAVE MEGGETT (also PR/KR) – 1989-1994 New York Giants, 1995-97 New England Patriots, 1998 New York Jets
Twice named All-Pro as a punt returner, played on five divisional championship teams and won one Super Bowl. Multi-faceted running back who had 336 career catches and amassed nearly 14,000 all-purpose yards during 10 NFL seasons.

ERIC METCALF (also WR/PR/KR) – 1989-1994 Cleveland Browns, 1995-96 Atlanta Falcons, 1997 San Diego Chargers, 1998 Arizona Cardinals, 1999 Carolina Panthers, 2001 Washington Redskins, 2002 Green Bay Packers
Accumulated more than 17,000 all-purpose yards during 13-season NFL career. Twice named All-Pro and voted to three Pro Bowls as kick returner. Career total included 541 receptions. Led NFL once in kickoff return yardage, punt return yardage and punt return average.

HERSCHEL WALKER – 1986-89, 1996-97 Dallas Cowboys, 1989-1991 Minnesota Vikings, 1992-94 Philadelphia Eagles, 1995 New York Giants
Versatile player who racked up more than 18,000 all-purpose yards during 12 seasons. Recorded two 1,000-yard rushing seasons and accumulated 512 career receptions. Also averaged 23.6 yards per kickoff return over career. Voted to two Pro Bowls.

RICKY WATTERS – 1992-94 San Francisco 49ers, 1995-97 Philadelphia Eagles, 1998-2001 Seattle Seahawks
Played on four divisional title and one Super Bowl championship team. Rushed for 10,643 career yards and topped 1,000-yard mark seven times. Also added 467 career catches for 4,248 yards. Selected to five Pro Bowls.


WIDE RECEIVERS

#PFHOF14

*TIM BROWN (also KR) – 1988-2003 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders, 2004 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Nine-time Pro Bowl selection. Recorded 1,094 receptions for 14,934 yards and 100 touchdowns during 17-year career. Added 3,320 yards on punt returns, 1,235 yards on kickoffs and 190 rushing yards for 19,679 career yards.

GARY CLARK – 1985-1992 Washington Redskins, 1993-94 Phoenix /Arizona Cardinals, 1995 Miami Dolphins
Two-time Super Bowl Champion caught 699 passes for 10,856 yards and 65 touchdowns during 11 playing seasons. Named to four Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro twice (1987, 1991).

MARK CLAYTON – 1983-1992 Miami Dolphins, 1993 Green Bay Packers
Compiled 8,974 yards on 582 receptions and 84 touchdowns during 11-year career. Selected to five Pro Bowls and led the league in touchdown receptions in both 1984 (18) and 1988 (14).

HENRY ELLARD  (also PR) – 1983-1993 Los Angeles Rams, 1994-98 Washington Redskins, 1998 New England Patriots
Three-time first-team All-Pro selection. Played in 228 games and recorded 814 receptions for 13,777 yards and 65 touchdowns in 16 seasons. Returned 135 punts for 1,527 yards and four touchdowns. Named to three Pro Bowls.

#MARVIN HARRISON – 1996-2008 Indianapolis Colts
A six-time first-team All-Pro selection and named to eight Pro Bowls. Led NFL in receiving two seasons. Finished career with 1,102 receptions for 14,580 yards and 128 touchdowns. Set single-season mark with 143 catches, 2002.

KEYSHAWN JOHNSON – 1996-99 New York Jets, 2000-03 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-05 Dallas Cowboys, 2006 Carolina Panthers
Recorded 70 or more receptions in nine seasons. Totaled 814 receptions, 10,571 receiving yards and 64 receiving touchdowns during 11-season career. Named to Pro Bowl three times.

KEENAN MCCARDELL – 1991, 2007 Washington Redskins, 1992-95 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2001 Jacksonville Jaguars, 2002-03 Tampa Bay Buccaneeers, 2004-06 San Diego Chargers
Career receiving totals include 883 receptions, 11,373 yards and 63 touchdowns during 17 seasons. Selected to two Pro Bowls. Recorded 70 receptions in a season seven times.

*ANDRE REED – 1985-1999 Buffalo Bills, 2000 Washington Redskins
Helped lead Bills to unprecedented four straight Super Bowls. Seven-time Pro Bowl selection, caught 951 receptions for 13,198 yards and 87 touchdowns in 16 seasons. All-Conference four times and Second-Team All-Pro three consecutive seasons.

STERLING SHARPE – 1988-1994 Green Bay Packers
Three-time first-team All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl selection. Led the NFL in receptions three times in seven seasons. Finished career with 595 receptions, 8,134 receiving yards and 65 touchdowns.
   
JIMMY SMITH – 1992 Dallas Cowboys, 1995-2005 Jacksonville Jaguars   
In 12 playing seasons, amassed 862 receptions, 12,287 receiving yards and 67 receiving touchdowns. Led the NFL in receptions in 1999 and was selected to the Pro Bowl five times.

ROD SMITH – 1995-2006 Denver Broncos
Two-time Super Bowl champion and three-time Pro Bowl selection. Recorded 849 receptions for 11,389 yards and 68 touchdowns during 183 games over 12 playing seasons. Totaled eight career 1,000-yard receiving seasons including six straight.

TIGHT END

MARK BAVARO – 1985-1990 New York Giants, 1992 Cleveland Browns, 1993-94 Philadelphia Eagles
Recorded 351 receptions for 4,733 yards and 39 touchdowns during 126 games in nine seasons. Two-time first-team All-Pro and Pro Bowl selection and won two Super Bowl championships.

OFFENSIVE LINEMEN

Seniors
On Aug. 21, the Hall of Fame's Seniors Committee nominated Ray Guy (left) and Claude Humphrey. They are automatic finalists who will be joined by 15 modern-era nominees for consideration for election.
Bios: Ray Guy | Claude Humphrey
#WILLIE ANDERSON – T – 1996-2007 Cincinnati Bengals, 2008 Baltimore Ravens
Played in a total of 195 games with a string of 116 straight starts. Named to four Pro Bowls from 2004-07 and selected first-team All-Pro three seasons 2004-06.

TONY BOSELLI – T – 1995-2001 Jacksonville Jaguars, 2002 Houston Texans (injured reserve)
Played in 91 career games over seven playing seasons. Selected to five Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three straight seasons (1997-99).

LOMAS BROWN – T – 1985-1995 Detroit Lions, 1996-98 Arizona Cardinals, 1999 Cleveland Browns, 2000-01 New York Giants, 2002 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Named to the Pro Bowl seven consecutive times over an 18-year career. Selected as a first- or second-team All-Pro six times. Played in 263 career games, winning four division, two conference and one Super Bowl championships.

JIM COVERT
– T – 1983-1990 Chicago Bears
Helped the Bears to six division, one conference and one Super Bowl championships during eight-year career. Played in 111 career games. Named first-team All-Pro twice and selected to two Pro Bowls. 

JAY HILGENBERG – C – 1981-1991 Chicago Bears, 1992 Cleveland Browns, 1993 New Orleans Saints
Seven-time Pro Bowl selection during 13 playing seasons. Named first-team All-Pro three times and All-NFC seven consecutive seasons (1985-1991). Played in 188 career games.

CHRIS HINTON – G/T – 1983-89 Baltimore/Indianapolis Colts, 1990-93 Atlanta Falcons, 1994-95 Minnesota Vikings 
Selected first- or second-team All-Pro five times as both a guard and a tackle. Named to the Pro Bowl seven and All-Conference six times during 13-year career. Played in 177 games.  

KENT HULL – C – 1986-1996 Buffalo Bills
Helped lead the Bills to six division and four conference championships. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and named to three Pro Bowl teams. During 11 seasons, played in 170 games and a full 16-game schedule nine times.

JOE JACOBY – T – 1981-1993 Washington Redskins
Three-time first-team All-Pro helped the Redskins win four division, four conference and three Super Bowl championships. Played in a total of 170 games and named to four Pro Bowls during 13 seasons.

#WALTER JONES – T – 1997-2008 Seattle Seahawks
A nine-time Pro Bowler and six-time All-Pro during 12-year career. Played in a total of 180 games while helping the Seahawks to five division titles and one conference championship.

MIKE KENN – T – 1978-1994 Atlanta Falcons
Over 17 seasons, played 251 games which is the most in Falcons history. Named first-team All-Pro three times and All-NFC five times. Selected to play in five consecutive Pro Bowls.

JIM LACHEY – T – 1985-87 San Diego Chargers, 1988 Los Angeles Raiders, 1988-1992, 1994-95 Washington Redskins 
Named to the Pro Bowl three times and played in a total of 131 games during 10 seasons. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and All-Conference four times.

DON MOSEBAR – C – 1983-1994 Los Angeles Raiders
Helped the Raiders to three division titles, one conference championship and one Super Bowl victory over 12-year career. Played in 173 games and was named first-team All-Pro once. Selected to play in three Pro Bowls.

TOM NALEN – C – 1994-2007 Denver Broncos
Played in 194 total games during a 14-year career. Helped lead the Broncos to three division, two conference and two Super Bowl titles. Selected to five Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three times.

NATE NEWTON – G – 1986-1998 Dallas Cowboys, 1999 Carolina Panthers
During 198- game, 14-season career, teams won six division, three conference and three Super Bowl titles. Named to six Pro Bowls, selected first-team All-Pro twice and All-NFC four times.

*WILL SHIELDS – G – 1993-2006 Kansas City Chiefs
Named to Pro Bowl 12 consecutive times. Played in a total of 224 games over 14 seasons, never missing a game. Selected first-team All-Pro three times and All-AFC seven times.

STEVE WISNIEWSKI – G – 1989-2001 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders
Played in 207 games missing only two games during a 13-year career. Named to eight Pro Bowls and selected first- or second-team All-Pro as well as All-AFC seven times.

 

-DEFENSE-


DEFENSIVE LINEMEN

JEROME BROWN – DT – 1987-1991 Philadelphia Eagles
A dominant figure on defensive line. Earned two All-Pro, All-NFC, and Pro Bowl selections. Promising career cut short in 1992 when killed in car accident.

*CHARLES HALEY – DE/LB – 1986-1991, 1999 San Francisco 49ers, 1992-96 Dallas Cowboys
One of the most gifted pass rushers of era. Only player in NFL history to win five Super Bowls. Registered 10 or more sacks six times during 12 playing seasons.

ED “TOO TALL” JONES – DE – 1974-78, 1980-89 Dallas Cowboys
Played 224 games during 15 seasons and never missed a game except  for the 1979 season when he boxed. A dominant passer rusher for the Cowboys’ “Doomsday Defense,” earned three Pro Bowl selections.

DEXTER MANLEY – DE – 1981-89 Washington Redskins, 1990 Phoenix Cardinals, 1991 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
One of most feared pass rushers of the 1980s. During a four-year span between 1983 and ’86, logged 57.5 sacks. Key contributor during two Redskins championship teams. Finished 11-season career with 97.5 QB takedowns. 

CHARLES MANN – DE – 1983-1993 Washington Redskins, 1994 San Francisco 49ers
A mainstay on the defensive line throughout 12-year career, had four seasons in which recorded 10 or more sacks. A four-time Pro Bowler, helped the Redskins to three Super Bowl victories.  

STEVE MCMICHAEL – DT/NT – 1980 New England Patriots, 1981-1993 Chicago Bears, 1994 Green Bay Packers
One of the most durable lineman of era, played 213 games during 15-year career. A three-time All-Pro choice,  ecorded 95.5 overall sacks and three safeties.

FRED SMERLAS – NT – 1979-1989 Buffalo Bills, 1990 San Francisco 49ers, 1991-92 New England Patriots
One of first great nose tackles, anchored the Buffalo Bills “Bermuda Triangle” defense in the early-1980s. A three-time All-Pro choice, earned five Pro Bowl selections.

*MICHAEL STRAHAN – DE – 1993-2007 New York Giants
Set NFL single-season record with 22.5 sacks in 2001 and finished 15 playing seasons with 141.5 QB drops. Selected to seven Pro Bowls and a five-time All-Pro choice.

TED WASHINGTON – DT/NT – 1991-93 San Francisco 49ers, 1994 Denver Broncos, 1995-2000 Buffalo Bills, 2001-02 Chicago Bears, 2003 New England Patriots, 2004-05 Oakland Raiders, 2006-07 Cleveland Browns
A four-time Pro Bowl choice and All-Pro selection in 2001, played in 236 games during 17-year career. A regular anchor on the defensive line, logged a total of 34.5 sacks and one safety.

BRYANT YOUNG – DE – 1994-2007 San Francisco 49ers
One of the most disruptive defensive players during 14-year career. Named to four Pro Bowls, two All-Pro teams and Comeback Player of the Year, 1999.
LINEBACKERS

CORNELIUS BENNETT – 1987-1995 Buffalo Bills, 1996-98 Atlanta Falcons, 1999-2000 Indianapolis Colts
Won eight division and five conference championships during 14 seasons. The 1991 Defensive Player of the Year. Three-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl selection with 71.5 career sacks.

#DERRICK BROOKS – 1995-2008 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Named to Pro Bowl 11 times in 14-year career and selected first-team All-Pro six seasons. Played on four division championship and one Super Bowl winning team. Recorded 25 career interceptions, six of which were returned for TDs. 

#TEDY BRUSCHI – 1996-2008 New England Patriots
Leader of Patriots defense for 13-season, 189-game career. Voted to one Pro Bowl, recorded 30.5 sacks, intercepted 12 passes. Played on eight division title teams and three Super Bowl champions.

*KEVIN GREENE (also DE) – 1985-1992 Los Angeles Rams, 1993-95 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1996, 1998-99 Carolina Panthers, 1997 San Francisco 49ers
Retired after 15-season career as NFL’s third all-time leading sacker (160). A member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1990s and five-time Pro Bowler. Had 10 seasons with 10 or more sacks.

KEN HARVEY – 1988-1993 Phoenix Cardinals, 1994-98 Washington Redskins
A two-time All-Pro choice and was selected to four straight Pro Bowls (1995-98). Recorded 89.0 sacks and one safety during 11-year career.

CLAY MATTHEWS – 1978-1993 Cleveland Browns, 1994-96 Atlanta Falcons
When retired after 19 seasons, had played more games (278) than any other linebacker in NFL history and third most all-time. Selected to four Pro Bowls and one All-Pro team.

KARL MECKLENBURG – 1983-1994 Denver Broncos
Accumulated 70.0 sacks, five interceptions, two fumble recoveries for a TD, and one safety during 12-year career. A six-time Pro Bowl selection and an All-Pro choice four seasons.

#WILLIE MCGINEST (also DE) –1994-2005 New England Patriots, 2006-08 Cleveland Browns
Recorded 86 sacks in 212-game career that spanned 15 seasons. A two-time Pro Bowl pick, was member of six divisional championship teams and won three Super Bowls (XXXVI, XXXVIII, XXXIX).

SAM MILLS – LB – 1986-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-97 Carolina Panthers
A long-time leader on defense, earned five Pro Bowl selections and three first-team All-Pro nods. Accumulated 20.5 career sacks, 11 interceptions and three fumble recoveries for a TD.

DARRYL TALLEY – LB – 1983-1994 Buffalo Bills, 1995 Atlanta Falcons, 1996 Minnesota Vikings
Key contributor of the Bills defense for 13 seasons. Played in 216 games in 15 total seasons.  Logged career numbers of 38.5 sacks and 12 interceptions. A two-time Pro Bowl and All-Pro choice.

#ZACH THOMAS – 1996-2007 Miami Dolphins, 2008 Dallas Cowboys
Named first-team All-Pro five times, second-team All-Pro two seasons and elected to seven Pro Bowls. Topped 100 tackles in each of first 11 seasons and recorded 17 interceptions during 184-game career.

DEFENSIVE BACKS

ERIC ALLEN – CB – 1988-1994 Philadelphia Eagles, 1995-97 New Orleans Saints, 1998-2001 Oakland Raiders
A six-time Pro Bowl choice, recorded 54 interceptions for 826 yards and 8 touchdowns during 14 seasons. Selected first- or second-team All-Pro three times and first- or second-team All-NFC five times. Played 217 games.

STEVE ATWATER – S – 1989-1998 Denver Broncos, 1999 New York Jets
Recorded 24 interceptions for 408 yards, 8 touchdowns and 5 sacks during 11-year, 167-game career. Selected to play in eight Pro Bowls, named first- or second-team All-Pro four times and All-AFC six times. Helped lead teams to four division, three conference and two Super Bowl titles.

JOEY BROWNER – S – 1983-1991 Minnesota Vikings, 1992 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
10-year pro, registered 37 career interceptions for 465 yards, 3 touchdowns and 9.5 sacks in 145 games. Selected as first-team All-Pro four straight seasons and named to six Pro Bowls.

LEROY BUTLER – S – 1990-2001 Green Bay Packers
Totaled 38 interceptions for 533 yards and 1 touchdown during 12-year career. Recorded 20.5 sacks in 181 games and was named to four Pro Bowls. Selected first-team All-Pro four times.

#RODNEY HARRISON – S –  1994-2002 San Diego Chargers, 2003-08 New England Patriots
Retired as the NFL’s all-time leader in sacks for a defensive back (30.5). Tallied 34 interceptions over 15 seasons that included six divisions, four conference, and two Super Bowl championships.

ALBERT LEWIS – CB – 1983-1993 Kansas City Chiefs, 1994-98 Los Angeles/Oakland Raiders
Played in 225 games over 16 seasons. Earned two All-Pro and three All-AFC nods and four Pro Bowl selections.

JOHN LYNCH
– S – 1993-2003 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2004-07 Denver Broncos
One of the most decorated safeties in history, nine Pro Bowls at the position is second only to Hall of Famer Ken Houston. Registered 26 interceptions and three All-Pro and All-Conference selections during 15-year career.

#SAM MADISON – CB – 1997-2005 Miami Dolphins, 2006-08 New York Giants
Earned four Pro Bowl, three All-AFC, and two All-Pro selections during 12-year career. Stole 20 passes in three-year period (1998-2000). Finished career with 38 total interceptions.

#PATRICK SURTAIN – CB – 1998-2004 Miami Dolphins, 2005-08 Kansas City Chiefs
Played both corners and intercepted 37 passes in 11-season career. Named first-team All-Pro in back-to-back years (2002-03) and voted to three straight Pro Bowls.

TROY VINCENT
– CB/S – 1992-95 Miami Dolphins, 1996-2003 Philadelphia Eagles, 2004-06 Buffalo Bills, 2006 Washington Redskins
Picked off 47 passes for 711 yards and 3 TDs during 15-season career. Named All-Pro once and voted to five straight Pro Bowls. Played on five divison championship teams.

EVERSON WALLS – CB – 1981-89 Dallas Cowboys, 1990-92 New York Giants, 1992-93 Cleveland Browns
Recorded 57 interceptions during 13-year career. Led the league in interceptions three times. Voted to four Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro three times. Played on three division championship teams and won one Super Bowl.

*AENEAS WILLIAMS
– CB/S – 1991-2000 Phoenix/Arizona Cardinals, 2001-04 St. Louis Rams
Registered 55 interceptions for 807 yards and nine TDs in 14-season career. A member of the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1990s, voted to eight Pro Bowls and named first-team All-Pro four times.

DARREN WOODSON – S – 1992-2003 Dallas Cowboys
A four-time All-Pro and five-time Pro Bowl pick, played on six division championship teams and won three Super Bowls. Recorded 23 interceptions for 271 yards in career


-SPECIAL TEAMS-


KICKERS/PUNTER

MORTEN ANDERSEN
– K – 1982-1994 New Orleans Saints, 1995-2000, 2006-07 Atlanta Falcons, 2001 New York Giants, 2002-03 Kansas City Chiefs, 2004 Minnesota Vikings
The NFL’s all-time leading scorer with 2,544 points accumulated over a 25-season career. Connected on 849 PATs and 565 field goals. Named All-Pro five times and selected to seven Pro Bowls.

GARY ANDERSON
– K – 1982-1994 Pittsburgh Steelers, 1995-96 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997 San Francisco 49ers, 1998-2002 Minnesota Vikings, 2003-04 Tennessee Titans
In 23 NFL seasons, connected on 538 field goals and 820 extra points for a career total of 2,434 points. Named to four Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro twice, played on seven division championship teams. Set then-record 164 points, 1998.

SEAN LANDETA – P – 1985-1993 New York Giants, 1993-96, 2003-04 Los Angeles/St. Louis Rams, 1997 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1998 Green Bay Packers, 1999-2002, 2005 Philadelphia Eagles
Helped teams win six division, two conference and two Super Bowl championships. In 284 games over 21 seasons amassed 60,707 yards on 1,401 punts for a net average of 43.3. Named to two Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro three times.

NICK LOWERY – K –  1978 New England Patriots, 1980-1993 Kansas City Chiefs, 1994-96 New York Jets
Converted 383 field goals and 562 extra points for 1,711 points in 18-season career. Eclipsed the 100-point total 11 times. Voted to three Pro Bowls and selected first-team All-Pro four times.
 

SPECIAL TEAMS/POSITION PLAYER

BRIAN MITCHELL – RB/KR/PR – 1990-99 Washington Redskins, 2000-02 Philadelphia Eagles, 2003 New York Giants
One of the most productive kick/punt returners in NFL history. Ranks first in record book in number of returns and yards in both categories. A two-time All-Pro choice, 23,330 combined net yards is second all-time.

STEVE TASKER – ST/WR – 1985-86 Houston Oilers, 1986-1997 Buffalo Bills
Earned seven Pro Bowl invitations as a special teams player. Only person in NFL history to earn Pro Bowl MVP honors at that position (1993). All-Pro choice five times and All-AFC seven seasons.

-COACHES-

 
BILL ARNSPARGER – 1964-69 Baltimore Colts, 1970-73, 1976-1983 Miami Dolphins, 1974-76 New York Giants  
Total of 20 seasons included three as head coach. Mastermind of Dolphins defense that captured six division, four conference championships and two Super Bowls. Also had one division, two conference championships and one league championship with the Colts.

DON CORYELL – 1973-77 St. Louis Cardinals, 1978-1986 San Diego Chargers
Revolutionized the modern passing game and led the NFL into an era of explosive offensive football. Coached teams to a 114-89-1 record and six division championships. Named 1974 Coach of the Year.

BILL COWHER – 1992-2006 Pittsburgh Steelers
A two-time NFL Coach of the Year (1992 and 2004). Led Steelers to eight division championships and a victory in Super Bowl XL. Overall record in 15 seasons: 161-99-1.

#TONY DUNGY – 1996-2001 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 2002-08 Indianapolis Colts
Suffered only one losing season in 13 years as head coach. Won six division titles, one conference championship, and one Super Bowl victory. Named to the 2000s NFL All-Decade Team.

TOM FLORES – 1979-1987 Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders, 1992-94 Seattle Seahawks
One of only 13 coaches who have won two or more Super Bowls. Led teams to an overall record of 105-90 record. 1982 AFC Coach of the Year, 1982.

#JON GRUDEN – 1998-2001 Oakland Raiders, 2002-08 Tampa Bay Buccaneers
Compiled 100-85 overall record during 11-year career. Led teams to five division crowns, one conference championship and one Super Bowl title. Named NFL Coach of the Year by ESPN in 2002.

#MIKE HOLMGREN – 1992-98 Green Bay Packers, 1999-2008 Seattle Seahawks 
Led teams to an overall 174-122 record over a 17-year career. Compiled 14 winning seasons during career including eight straight from 1992-99. Led teams to eight division titles, three conference championships and one Super Bowl win.

JIMMY JOHNSON – 1989-1993 Dallas Cowboys, 1996-99 Miami Dolphins 
Helped develop the Cowboys into the team of the ‘90s. Led them to two Super Bowl titles in just five years with the team. The 1990 NFL Coach of the Year, logged an 89-68 overall record in nine total seasons.

CHUCK KNOX – 1973-77, 1992-94 Los Angeles Rams, 1978-1982 Buffalo Bills, 1983-1991 Seattle Seahawks
A three-time NFL coach of the Year and  four-time conference Coach of the Year recipient. Led teams to seven division championships and 193-158-1 record in 22 seasons.

BUDDY PARKER – 1949 Chicago Cardinals, 1951-56 Detroit Lions, 1957-1964 Pittsburgh Steelers
The 1956 NFL Coach of the Year,  led the Detroit Lions to back-to-back NFL championships in 1952-53. In 15 seasons as a head coach, compiled a 107-76-9 record.

RICHIE PETITBON – 1974-77 Houston Oilers, 1978-93 Washington Redskins
As Redskins defensive coordinator for 15 seasons, helped coach the team to five divisions, four conference and three Super Bowl championships.

DAN REEVES – 1981-1992 Denver Broncos, 1993-96 New York Giants, 1997-2003 Atlanta Falcons
Earned NFL Coach of the Year honors (1984, 1993, 1998) with all three teams he coached. Won six division and four conference championships. Overall record is 201-174-2.

LOU SABAN – 1960-61 Boston Patriots, 1962-65, 1972-76 Buffalo Bills, 1967-1971 Denver Broncos
Two-time AFL Coach of the Year and led the Bills to back-to-back AFL championships (1964-65). Career record after 16 seasons, 97-101-7.

MARTY SCHOTTENHEIMER – 1984-88 Cleveland Browns, 1989-1998 Kansas City Chiefs, 2001 Washington Redskins, 2002-06 San Diego Chargers
Led three teams to a total of eight division championships. Earned 2004 NFL Coach of the Year honors. Overall record in 21 seasons was 205-139-1.

CLARK SHAUGHNESSY – 1944-47 Washington Redskins, 1948-49 Los Angeles Rams, 1951-1962 Chicago Bears
Longtime assistant coach for George Halas and the Chicago Bears. Regarded as one of the greatest football minds. Devised multiple schemes on offense and defense, most notably the T-formation.

DICK VERMEIL – 1976-1982 Philadelphia Eagles, 1997-99 St. Louis Rams, 2001-05 Kansas City Chiefs
Two-time NFL Coach of the Year (1979, 1999), Led three different teams to division championships. Led Rams to Super Bowl XXXIV victory. Overall record is 126-114-0 in 15 seasons.


-CONTRIBUTORS-


K. S. (BUD) ADAMS, JR. – Owner – 1960-Present Houston Oilers/Tennessee Oilers/Titans
Founder of franchise and member of the “Foolish Club” as one of original AFL owners. Has been at helm of franchise that claimed nine division titles, 21 playoff appearances, two AFL championships, and one Super Bowl berth.

BOBBY BEATHARD – Team Executive/General Manager  – 1966-67 Kansas City Chiefs, 1968-1971 Atlanta Falcons, 1972-77 Miami Dolphins, 1978-1988 Washington Redskins, 1990-99 San Diego Chargers 
As a longtime general manager in the NFL,  built multiple teams into winners. Collectively, clubs have claimed 10 division crowns, one AFL title, and four Super Bowl championships.

GIL BRANDT – Team Executive/Personnel Director – 1960-1988 Dallas Cowboys, 1995-present National Football League
Vice President of Personnel that helped the Cowboys become one of the most dominating teams in league history. Noted for innovative scouting and personnel systems that are today standard practice in the NFL.

LEO CARLIN – Team Administrator – 1960-Present Philadelphia Eagles
Vital member of Eagles organization and has managed ticket operations for the team since 1960s. Pioneered many innovations in the ticketing industry.

RED CASHION – Official – 1972-1996 National Football League
Served for 25 seasons as on-field official, first as a line judge before becoming a referee, from 1972 to 1996. Officiated nearly 500 NFL games that include 20 postseason contests. Served as referee for two Super Bowls (XX and XXX).

JACK KENT COOKE – Owner – 1974-1997 Washington Redskins
Washington franchise won more than 200 games during tenure as the team owner.  The team qualified for the playoffs 11 times and advanced to the Super Bowl four times that included victories in Super Bowls XVII, XXII, and XXVI.

OTHO DAVIS – Trainer – 1971-72 Baltimore Colts, 1973-1995 Philadelphia Eagles
Spent two-plus decades in the NFL as an athletic trainer. Was recognized as Professional Trainer of the Year five times (1977, 1978, 1980, 1981, and 1987).

*EDWARD DEBARTOLO, JR. – Owner  1977-2000 San Francisco 49ers
During tenure, 49ers captured 13 divisional titles, made 16 playoff appearances, advanced to the NFC championship game 10 times and became the first NFL franchise to win five Super Bowls. San Francisco posted the best winning percentage in the NFL in both the 1980s and 1990s.

RON GIBBS – Official – 1940-1962 National Football League
Served as a referee for 23 seasons in the NFL. He worked every NFL championship game except four between 1942 and 1960 that included one stretch of five straight title games.

JERRY JONES – Owner/President/General Manager – 1989-present Dallas Cowboys
Innovative leader on team and league level. Took over Cowboys in 1989 and quickly transformed team into Super Bowl champions. Under guidance, Cowboys have won eight division, three NFC, and three Super Bowl championships. Guiding force behind concept, design, and completion of the state-of-the-art AT&T Stadium.

EDDIE KOTAL – Scout – 1947-1961 Los Angeles Rams
Regarded as NFL’s first full-time scout, pioneered modern scouting techniques and earned reputation of discovering hidden talent across the country. During service with the Rams, the team won four division titles and the 1951 NFL championship.

ROBERT KRAFT – Owner – 1994-Present New England Patriots
Led dramatic turnaround of franchise and created dynasty team. In two decades of ownership, franchise has captured 12 division titles, six AFC crowns, and three Super Bowl titles. The team’s six conference titles and six Super Bowl appearances are the most of any NFL owner in the Super Bowl era.

ELMER LAYDEN – Commissioner – 1941-46 National Football League
Named NFL’s Commissioner in 1941. Reign came at critical period as America officially entered World War II. Worked during difficult times to maintain the momentum NFL gained in the 1930s.

ART MCNALLY – Official/Administrator – 1959-present National Football League
Spent nine seasons (1959-1967) as on-field official, one year as field judge and eight as referee. In 1968, he was appointed as the NFL’s Supervisor of Officials. Credited with bringing technology to the NFL and implemented in-depth training for official by using video. 

*ART MODELL – Owner – 1961-1995 Cleveland Browns, 1996-2011 Baltimore Ravens
Spent 43 seasons of full ownership in NFL. Influential chairman of the NFL’s Broadcast Committee for 21 years. In all, Browns made seven NFL/AFC championship game appearances and the Ravens played in three AFC championship games and won Super Bowl XXXV.

BILL POLIAN – Team President/General Manager – 1978-1982 Kansas City Chiefs, 1984-1992 Buffalo Bills, 1993-94 National Football League, 1995-97 Carolina Panthers, 1998-2011 Indianapolis Colts
Built three franchises into winners. In all, guided teams to 13 division titles, five conference championships, and one Super Bowl victory.

STEVE SABOL – President, NFL Films – 1964-2012
Distinguished filmmaker whose artistic vision helped revolutionize the way fans watch the NFL. Won 35 individual Emmys in numerous categories and in 2003 was honored with the Lifetime Achievement Emmy from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences.

PAUL TAGLIABUE – Commissioner – 1989-2006 National Football League
During 17-year tenure as the NFL’s Commissioner, oversaw growth of the league from 28 to 32 teams, supported the construction of 20 new stadiums, negotiated successive labor agreements, create league-wide Internet network, and secured the largest television rights deals in entertainment history.

JIM TUNNEY – Official  1960-1991 National Football League
Served as NFL referee for 32 seasons. Among 29 playoff assignments were ten championship games and serving as the referee for three Super Bowls (VI, XI, XII).

RON WOLF – Team Executive/General Manager – 1991-2001 Green Bay Packers
Orchestrated turnaround of once down-trodden franchise. Under tutelage and excellent drafting of players, the Packers claimed back-to-back NFC championships, three straight division crowns, and a victory in Super Bowl XXXI.

GEORGE YOUNG – Team Executive/General Manager – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-78 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League
Noted for excellent personnel evaluation knowledge, greatest fame came when turned around the Giants franchise. Under leadership, the team ended long postseason draught by capturing four NFC East titles and victories in Super Bowls XXI and XXV.



Recent Comments
  • Karl - January 10 2014 06:01 AM

    If you are not going to put Ray Guy in the HOF just get rid of the position. Make teams go for it on fourth down and if they don't make it, the other team gets the ball, then see what you think about punters..............No Ray Guy, REALLY!

    Report Violation

  • JJ - January 06 2014 01:56 AM

    How is it possible that Ray Guy has been overlooked again? I know punters don't score points the way place kickers do but NOBODY punted a ball like Ray Guy did. He was the best at what he did and he deserves a place among the games best.

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  • chefie - December 28 2013 12:34 PM

    ok...heres my choices for 5: (plus the 2 seniors) = 7 1 WR...choose between; Tim Brown, Andre Reed or Sterling Sharpe 1 RB...choose between; Jerome Bettis or Terrell Davis....seriously?...TD...if those stats do not define HOF qualifications, what does??? NO QB,s this year....or next...no arguement 1 OL....theres so many, seriously... pick one, Joe Jacoby, Nate Newton, Hilgenberger, Will Shields, Walter Jones....(or your personal favorite, justified) 1 LB...this was tough; ANY LB listed...EVERY ONE OF THE LB'S ARE HOF MATERIAL....SOMEDAY.....maybe 1 DL...Charles Haley for crying out he is the only player in NFL history to own 5 championships, duh...so what if he is certifiable...its a wild, crazy way to live if you could possibly relate...could YOU do it...I dont think so OK...thats my pics...agree....or disagree...whatever...I love this ****

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  • BILL - December 13 2013 03:18 PM

    I DO NOT GET IT,, NO JERRY KRAMER???????????????

    Report Violation

  • Vincent - November 25 2013 08:08 AM

    Where is Joe Klecko ? Ignored again ..

    Report Violation

  • Pete - November 24 2013 11:47 AM

    STEVE SABOL! Without the Sabols most of us wouldn't even HAVE the greatest memories of the NFL that we all cherish.

    reported

  • bachslunch - November 23 2013 02:34 PM

    Folks, players like Stabler, Gabriel, Kramer, Guy, Curtis, Humphrey, Collins, Howley, Kemp, Pearson, Waters, Harris, and Kuechenberg are only eligible as Senior candidates anymore -- the prelims here are for regularly eligible candidates only. And unless someone nominates a candidate, they don't get considered -- no idea why folks like Hardy Nickerson, Irving Fryar, Richmond Webb, and Ben Coates didn't get listed, but the best way to insure they do is to spend a stamp and send in a nomination letter yourself to Joe Horrigan at the PFHoF sometime in February or March. And Kurt Warner isn't eligible yet -- you have to be retired 5 years first.

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  • Manny - November 22 2013 04:14 PM

    There are SOME valid arguments here, but REMEMBER that only FIVE are allowed each year. Some of you guys (and I'm not naming names) don't know squat. My picks are Charles Haley, Lomas Brown, Steve Wisniesky (Hate the Raiders), Rodney Harrison and Ed DeBartolo Jr. (Hate the 49er's).

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  • michael - November 21 2013 05:45 PM

    Charles Haley!!!! About time! There are many deserving of the hall on that list but if there was ever a DE player that should be in that hall its him! If you ever watched nfl during the 80's-90's you know what im talking about. As a fan of the game His image is still and probably always be in mind as one of the greatest! Im rooting for you!!!!

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  • Pete - November 21 2013 04:21 PM

    STEVE SABOL! Without the Sabols most of us wouldn't even HAVE the greatest memories of the NFL that we all cherish.

    Report Violation

  • Rocke Sweaney - November 21 2013 02:11 PM

    C'mon people.... Roman Gabriel MAYBE should be Inducted....BUT...he would have to be one of the SENIOR nominees. This thread is about the MODERN DAY SEMI-FINALISTS. NOT the Senior Nominees. This year, it is Claude Humphrey and Ray Guy. Tedy Bruschi. ONE Pro Bowl. Are you kidding me. I am a diehard Browns fan. Clay Mathews went to FOUR Pro Bowls, AND was ALL-PRO THREE times, and in my opinion, Clay doesn't deserve Induction. Clay was VERY Good, maybe even GREAT. Tedy Bruschi wasn't NEAR as good as Clay Mathews.

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  • tddbest - November 21 2013 01:16 PM

    If Gale Sayers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gayle_Sayers), who only played 6 years in the league, could be in the HOF then TD (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terrell_Davis) definitely deserves to be there hands down! Without TD, Denver Broncos would still be empty handed with Super Bowl wins. Compare stats between these two guys and tell me who had more of a team impact in a less time frame? TD would have kept breaking records if he did not have a career ending injury. NFL MVP, Super Bowl MVP, 2000 yd rusher, Back to Back Super Bowl Champion. You all can say what you want, but this guy was incredible player in his 7 year career and deserves to be in the Hall! Let's get TD in Bronco Nation! VOTE TD! VOTE TD! VOTE TD! VOTE TD! VOTE TD!

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  • Nancy S - November 21 2013 09:56 AM

    Tedy Bruschi. He stands for all that is good in the NFL. He has performed remarkably with CLASS on and off the field. He did whatever he was asked to do without hesitation. He was not only a great performer but a team leader. He is truly a positive role model. He does represent all that is good in football

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  • Steve - November 21 2013 07:51 AM

    ROMAN GABRIEL! ROMAN GABRIEL!ROMAN GABRIEL! Roman Gabriel, 1968 Pro Bowl MVP, 1969 NFL MVP (L.A. Rams), 1973 NFL Comeback Player of the Year (Philadelphia Eagles), and a 4x Pro Bowl selection should be inducted into the NFL Hall of Fame. He played 16 seasons in the NFL and at 6'4" 225 lbs, was the NFL's original BIG quarterback. The son of a Filipino immigrant, he was the first Asian-American to start as an NFL quarterback and is considered by many to have been one of the best players at that position during the late 1960s and early 70s.

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  • concerned81 - November 21 2013 06:47 AM

    HOF is more about being popular. Getting a broadcasting job on NFL games helps your chances. There are some great players who will never get there.

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  • sweetg - November 21 2013 04:20 AM

    if I had a vote Guy, Humphrey , Haley , Strachan , Walter jones , brooks and Marvin Harrison.this year.other in final 15, shields , reed , brown , bettis , terrell davis , Williams , coryell , debartelo ,dungy

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  • Rocke Sweaney - November 20 2013 10:09 PM

    Blake, you are TOOOOO Funny. 100 years from now, Everson Walls, Jerry Jones and Ed Jones will NOT be in the Hall. They have ZERO chance. And at BEST, Haley is 50/50.

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  • Blake Harbuck - November 20 2013 09:54 PM

    Jerry Jones, Too Tall Jones, Charles Haley, and Everson Walls for the HOF! Period!

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  • Vandy - November 20 2013 09:01 PM

    Andre Reed, Jerome Bettis, Derrick Brooks, Joey Browner (Ronnie Lott calls Joey one of the best ever), Charles Haley, Walter Jones, Michael Strahan and the GREAT Steve Sabol. (Yep, Tim Brown should be already in there).

    Report Violation

  • sam hackney - November 20 2013 08:05 PM

    Herschel Walker, Sam Mills, Doug Flutie and others on this list played for USFL teams and had some great years. Why are USFL teams not listed by their name? It's the Pro Football Hall of Fame and it's disrespectful not to mention the CFL (Frutie) or USFL.

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  • Rocke Sweaney - November 20 2013 07:54 PM

    I don't really want to get into who SHOULD be elected right now, I think most of the deserving are pretty clear : Aeneas Williams, Walter Jones, Will Shields, Michael Strahan, Paul Tagliabue, maybe a couple of others.... Don't worry.. I KNOW only 5 from this group can get in. I just hope, that ONCE AGAIN, two people who DO NOT DESERVE election, will once again be bypassed. Who ???? Jerome Bettis and Charles Haley. Bettis : 6 X Pro Bowl and 3 X ALL PRO. Meanwhile, Al "OX" Wistert, who was ALL DECADE in the 1940's and an EIGHT TIME 1ST Team ALL-PRO is still waiting. 3.9 YPC average...VERY Nice Jerome. Charles Haley : 5 X Pro Bowl and 2 X ALL-PRO. I can name 100 people with MORE Pro Bowls and More ALL-PRO seasons than either Bettis or Haley. They were GOOD Players, even VERY Good, borderline GREAT Players....But HALL OF FAME GREAT.... NO !!!!!

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  • Scot - November 20 2013 07:33 PM

    Where is Chuck Howley?????????????????Has 4 turnovers in 4 super bowls and is the only mvp from losing in sb history

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  • Dan DeVite - November 20 2013 07:18 PM

    I would like to see: Jerome Bettis, Coach Cowher and Tony Dungy make into the HOF.

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  • Hunter Wright - November 20 2013 07:16 PM

    Where is Ken Stabler!? He has numbers, big moments, super bowls, and was a Raider in the heyday. INDUCT THE SNAKE!

    Report Violation

  • Ryan - November 20 2013 06:29 PM

    Mongo and Lynch...everyone else is up for debate...

    Report Violation

  • NJGERRYG - November 20 2013 05:44 PM

    Cardinals/49ers S TIM McDONALD - One of the most FEROCIOU****ters I ever had the pleasure to witness! As a season ticket holder of the IGGLES, Tim always brought the thunder when playing at THE VET in Philly. Those battles between the Cards & Eagles on the pool felt turf at Veterans Stadium were what Division play was all about in the late 80s and entire 90s. He went to six Pro-Bowls as a Card/Niner. Forty as in 4 ZERO interceptions; over 1000 tackles! Returned 4 INTs for TDs and one punt return for a TD! A wonderful team player who was great to the fans too. Give him his PROPS and get TIM McDONALD in the ProFB HOF.

    Report Violation

  • Mike - November 20 2013 05:10 PM

    Green Bay Packer Great JERRY KRAMER a travesty he is not in the HOF.

    reported

  • william koo - November 20 2013 04:12 PM

    Mr EDWARD DEBARTOLO JR BEING SAN FRANCISCO A SUPER BOWL CHAMPION IN 1980 WHAT WE NEED THE MOST THAN FALLOW BY FOUR MORE CHAMPION IN TEN YEARS HE IS THE MOST BELOVED MAN IN SAN FRANCISCO PLEASE LET THIS MAN IN WHOLD CITY OF SAN FRANCISCO WILL BE JOY.

    reported

  • Robert Baughman - November 20 2013 03:02 PM

    Clay Matthews sr, Jerry. Kramer, Ray Guy and Phil Simms.

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  • Rod Tate - November 20 2013 02:23 PM

    Mike Curtis #32 Baltimore Colts, Madd Dogg aka Capt Crunch. Vote him in!

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  • Brendan McCormick - November 20 2013 02:11 PM

    STEVE MCMICHAEL, DT/NT, 1981-1993 Chicago Bears, deserves to be in the Pro Hall of Fame! Due to his ability to take control of the middle of the Defensive Line on the greatest defense in the history of the game the Ends were able to run up field every play on their way to the Quarterback and the Linebackers were free to run to the ball. His shadow allowed Mike Singletary's eyes to open so wide when he realized that Steve had control of the blockers in front and he had a free path to the Running Back. His endurance while playing 213 games during 15-year career with 191 consecutive starts is amazing! A three-time All-Pro choice with 95.5 overall sacks and three safeties should be statement enough for his induction.

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  • Chris Z - November 20 2013 02:06 PM

    Claude Humphrey should be in the HOF. The Hall needs to recognize one of Falcons initial players from the 60's and 70's. With all due respect, The Tampa Bay Bucaneers have Lee Roy Selmon and the Seattle Seahawks have Steve Largent, both franchise intitial team members, inducted into the Hall and those franchises came into existense ten years after Atlanta did. No one from the Falcons have been enshrined until just two years ago, which was way over due.

    reported

  • RDC - November 20 2013 01:44 PM

    Gary Collins - WR/P - Cleveland Browns....1962-1971, though the way he retired could have ticked off the ol' boy's network of sportswriters way back in the day - he demanded a trade to the Redskins or Jets after several disputes with head coach Nick Skorich; the club refused to make a deal and he walked away from the game.

    reported

  • Michael Lesser - November 17 2013 12:05 PM

    Mike Curtis, Baltimore Colts-Super Bowl Champion, multiple pro-bowler. Only linebacker to ever be all pro at both outside and middle linebacker and gave us the epic treatment of a scofflaw fan who entered the field of play without permission!. C'mon man!

    reported

  • Ed - November 16 2013 12:09 PM

    I think Bob Kuechenberg from the Miami Dolphins 1970's offensive line should be a canidate for sure!!!! Great Player... I also think Tight ends Keith Jackson and Eric Greene deserve to be on the list of tight ends inducted

    reported

  • Ed - November 16 2013 12:08 PM

    I think Bob Kuechenberg from the Miami Dolphins 1970's offensive line should be a canidate for sure!!!! Great Player... I also think Tight ends Keith Jackson and Eric Greene deserve to be on the list of tight ends inducted

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  • pure - November 15 2013 07:49 PM

    A lot of great players are not in the hall. Hats off to Ray Guy he should have been there a while ago. But for the good of the football . Why isn't Ken Anderson and L.C Greenwood in the hall of fame. It can be argued about a lot of things on their stats.(They have impressive stats) But over all being to great athletes and not in any trouble or imbarassment to professional sports, its time to give them their place where is is well deserved. Voters, fans commitee it makes sence to find a way to honor these two great athletes and their profession.

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  • zach - November 06 2013 10:15 PM

    Where Joe Klecko? A member of the sack exchange and heart of the jets d throughout most of the 80s. 4x pro bowl, 2x all pro and afc defensive player of the year. Enough with the teasing every year and induct him all ready.

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  • Eric - November 05 2013 04:48 PM

    Please be sure to induct some if not all of the Officials that have been nominated. They deserve to be honored for their dedication to Pro Football.

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  • Eric - November 05 2013 04:46 PM

    Please be sure to induct some if not all of the Officials that have been nominated. They deserve to be honored for their dedication to Pro Football.

    Report Violation

  • Ida Hurley - November 03 2013 02:33 PM

    Will Kurt Warner be inducted into the Hall of Fame? If not why not?!!!!!!

    reported

  • Rich Perez - November 02 2013 01:40 AM

    OVERDUE: JOEY BROWNER, MARK CLAYTON, ANDRE REED, RAY GUY, KENNY STABLER (NOT ON LIST?), NO GREATER HALL OF FAMER THAN JOEY BROWNER THE GAMES GREATEST STRONG SAFETY BY FAR!!!! Ask any former player who they feared the most...Joey Browner.

    Report Violation

  • John Ihrig - October 31 2013 05:01 AM

    Andre Reed, Will Shields, Charles Haley, Derrick Brooks, Aeneas Williams, Ray Guy, & Claude Humphrey

    reported

  • John Ihrig - October 30 2013 06:45 PM

    Andre Reed, Will Shields, Charles Haley, Derrick Brooks, Aeneas Williams, Ray Guy, & Claude Humphrey

    Report Violation

  • Jaime - October 30 2013 03:15 AM

    Drew Pearson and Cliff Harris should be in. They are long overdue. Both were on the 1970's All-Decade team. Pearson played in 3 Super Bowls, 7 NFC Championship games, and never played on a losing team while missing the playoffs only once in 11 seasons. Harris was a 6-time Pro Bowler and 4-time All-Pro selection with 5 Super Bowl appearances. ...doesn't get much better than that.

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  • Jaime - October 30 2013 01:59 AM

    Drew Pearson and Cliff Harris should be in. They are long overdue. Both were on the 1970's All-Decade team. Pearson played in 3 Super Bowls, 7 NFC Championship games, and never played on a losing team while missing the playoffs only once in 11 seasons. Harris was a 6-time Pro Bowler and 4-time All-Pro selection with 5 Super Bowl appearances. ...doesn't get much better than that.

    reported

  • marco antonio martinez - October 21 2013 09:27 AM

    hello i want to be considered for the pro hall of fame comments tanks!!

    Report Violation

  • rick - October 14 2013 06:41 AM

    Why isn't Jerry Kramer in the Hall??? Unbelievable.

    reported

  • Rob - October 09 2013 09:22 AM

    Joe Jacoby helped lead the Redskins to FIVE division titles and not 4.

    Report Violation

  • Ed - October 08 2013 01:37 PM

    Can someone please explain to me why Joe Klecko is not in the Hall of Fame?? I watched him play His whole career and everyone who played with him and against Him says he belongs! If u look at his career and the fact he was a Pro Bowl Player at 3 positions it's hard to believe there is no room for him in Canton!!

    reported

  • Jack - October 01 2013 07:05 PM

    Position by position: QB's - None : RB's- Terrell Davis - League MVP, SB MVP, 2,000 yds (Gale Sayers rule here) : WR's - Marvin Harrison (no doubter), Sterling Sharpe (He was better than his brother and a 3 time 1st team All-Pro before he got hurt) : OL - Walter Jones, Will Shields, Steve Wisniewski, Joe Jacoby, Mike Kenn, Tom Nalen (All multiple 1st team All-Pros) : DL - Michael Strahan, Jerome Brown (He would have been on the DT Mt Rushmore with Joe Greene, Bob Lilly, and Merlin Olsen) : LB's - Derrick Brooks, Zach Thomas, Kevin Greene (Guy has more sacks that LT and Derrick Thomas) : DB's - John Lynch, Joey Browner, Aeneas Williams, Darren Woodson : ST - None : Coaches - Dick Vermeil, Jimmy Johnson, Tony Dungy : Contribs - Eddie D, Ron Wolf, Bobby Beathard So I guess the rule is 1 vet, 5 modern, 1 Contrib - Cliff Branch, Terrell Davis, Marvin Harrison, Walter Jones, Will Shields, Derrick Brooks, Eddie D.

    reported

  • Jacki Regan - September 30 2013 09:03 AM

    When is Kurt Warner eligible for the hall roster? I jus****ched "A Football Life" and I always was impressed by his abilities as a QB, now WOW what a Human being...husband father and man...

    reported

  • Ken D. - September 19 2013 12:29 PM

    My short list of 19 for this year (since everyone else is putting their favorites down): Jerome Bettis, Roger Craig, Tim Brown, Marvin Harrison, Andre Reed, Lomas Brown, Walter Jones, Will Shields, Charles Haley, Michael Strahan, Derrick Brooks, Kevin Greene, Karl Mecklenburg, Steve A****er, Aeneas Williams, Darren Woodson, Steve Tasker, and Steve Sabol.

    reported

  • Michael - September 16 2013 09:14 AM

    Randall Cunningham, Jerome Bettis, Tim Brown, Joe Jacoby, Ray Guy, Leroy Butler, Tony Dungy

    reported

  • JOE BRODSKI - September 14 2013 09:21 PM

    Phil Simms is overdue to be in the hall of fame ecspecial because of the bad offensive lines he had in frot of him early in his career belongs in way before Kurt Warner

    reported

  • Paul R. - September 13 2013 01:31 PM

    AENEUS WILLIAMS: it's about time he is voted in. Deion Sanders got the publicity during the 90s with his return ability and flash but the best all round cornerback in the NFC (if not the entire NFL) during the 90s was Williams. To get recognized on the all decade team and with 8 pro bowls while playing most of his career on a bad AZ Cardinals team is extraorindary. Also, he either was the president or a leader of the Christian football players group for most of his career and is now an ordained minister in the St. Louis area. He always carried himself with grace and pride and it bothers me to see loud mouths and former bad boys like Michael Irving get all of the publicity while real men and pillars are overlooked. Want a athlete role model for your kids? Here he is. I hope the voters recognize and put him over the top this year as he is a wonderful representative for the league. The Comissioner ought to look him up and seek out his services to mentor players or even serve in an executive capacity for the NFL. Another favorite of mine who is not often given his due is Don Coryell, coach. I grew up going to STL football Cardinal games and later followed Coryell after he went to San Diego. As quarterbacks and coordinators can attest, there were really only three offenses run in the late 70s to mid 90s, and probably 70% of them were variation of the Coryell offense and nomenclature derived with the Cardiac Cardinals with Jim Hart, Terry Metcalf, Mel Gray, Dan Dierdorf and later expanded in SD with Fouts and others. People forget that Joe Gibbs was a Coryell student and asst. coach as were Jim Hannifan, Rod Dowhower, and a host of other offensive gurus. The Dallas Cowboys and Troy Aikman of the 90s ran the Coryell offense, as did the Bills and other exciting teams. Coryell's use of Terry Metcalf, a small quick back, during an era of bigger back, paved the way and was immulated in the use of Tony Dorsett, Greg Pruitt, Lydell Mitchell, James Brooks, Walter Payton, Thurman Thomas and Roger Craig. No, he did not win a Superbowl but his offense certainly did and he made a lasting imprint as an innovator and leader in the game. Not to diminish the works of Bill Walsh, but the so-called West Coast offense was really developed for teams with quarterbacks that lacked arm strenth. Coryell's offenses emphasized both downfield passing and intermediate routes. he also revolutionized the use of the tight end and h-back. Tony Dungy should be a first ballot admittee for his long work as a coordinator and head coach. Like Aeneus Williams, he's someone to be looked up at by players and coaches. A true gentleman and innovator. He spawned a plethora of successful assistant coaches, coordinators, and head coaches. Finally, I wish the NFL would set aside a display or section in Canton for period "impact players" who, because of injury or circumstances, may not have the longevity or carrer stats to get them inducted as a full member. For example, one of my favorite players was Roy Green. John Madden named him to his first All Madden Team and referred to Green as the best player in football during the same year that Dan Marino threw for his first 4000 yard season. Green, however, was from small Henderson State and drafted as a degensive back and returner, which was his role for three years. Then, the Cardinals coaching staff recognized his blazing speed would be better used on offense and he became an All Pro and the most feared deep threat in the game. Because his first three years were spent on defense, he never accumulated the stats of other receivers and then nagging injuries reduced his field time later in his career. Others similarly overlooked are the aforementioned Terry Metcalf and Wes Chandler.

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  • Allan - September 13 2013 12:17 PM

    man! what a good list to pick from! specially on the LB side!.. its something speical to have seen a good portion of these men play the game.

    reported

  • rick - September 13 2013 08:46 AM

    players are hard to choose, but Steve Sabol as a cntributor is a no-brainer..what would we have done without his films and such..NFL FIlms was a standard bearer

    reported

  • Michael - September 12 2013 04:35 PM

    @ Mike Ehlenbeck - Kurt Warner is eligible for the Class of 2015 with Junior Seau, Edgerrin James, Torry Holt, Isaac Bruce, Orlando Pace, Ty Law, Kevin Mawae, Jamal Lewis. Other notable first-time eligible candidates: 2016 - Brett Favre, Terrell Owens, Darren Sharper, Alan Faneca, Fred Taylor, Clinton Portis. 2017 - LaDainian Tomlinson, Jason Taylor, Brian Dawkins, Hines Ward. 2018 - Ray Lewis, Randy Moss, Brian Urlacher, Ronde Barber, Steve Hutchinson.

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  • Mike S. - September 12 2013 03:17 PM

    Jeffery: On Aug. 21, the Hall of Fame's Seniors Committee nominated Ray Guy & Claude Humphrey. They are automatic finalists who will be joined by 15 modern-era nominees for consideration for election.

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  • Mike Ehlenbeck - September 12 2013 02:50 PM

    I'm very surprised that Kurt Warner isn't on this list. From what I see, only Derrick Brooks and Michael Strahan are sure to make it to Canton. When will Kurt Warner be eligible?

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  • Adam - September 12 2013 12:52 PM

    I am not sure why that posted more than once, but you can understand my point :P

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  • Adam - September 12 2013 12:51 PM

    I am so tired of Mark Bavaro being the only tight end nominee. He doesn't deserve it. Everyone who is honest will admit that the Giants won their Super Bowls on the backs of Lawrence Taylor, Harry Carson, Leonard Marshall and the rest of the defense. Mark Bavaro was only selected to two Pro Bowls. He only played with the Giants for six years before finishing with marginal success in three seasons split between Philadelphia and Cleveland. A nine year career, with three or four prime years for a tight end in the modern era does not deserve consideration. Another tight end in the same conference who played at the same time has individual numbers and individual accolades that far surpass anything Mark Bavaro did. Steve Jordan was A seventh-round draft choice out of Brown University of the Ivy League in 1982. In 1985 Jordan had a career high 68 catches and the next season he was selected to his first of six straight Pro Bowls; 1986-91, the years that Bavaro won his Super Bowls. Among the tight ends that have received serious consideration for the Hall of Fame and haven't been inducted, Jordan has more receiving yards and more Pro Bowl selections than five of them (Mark Bavaro, Todd Christensen, Ben Coates, Russ Francis and Brent Jones), and more receptions than all of them with the exception of Ben Coates. Steve also went to more Pro Bowls than six of the eight modern era tight ends who have been inducted (Dave Casper, Mike Ditka, John Mackey, Ozzie Newsome, Jackie Smith, Kellen Winslow, Charlie Sanders, and Shannon Sharpe) and also had more career catches than all but Newsome, Winslow and Sharpe. Steve Jordan did all of this with Tommy Kramer, Steve Dils, Wade Wilson, Rich Gannon, Sean Salisbury, and Jim McMahon throwing him passes. The time has come to stop overstating Bavaro's accomplishments and recognize how great of a tight end Steve Jordan was in the last era where tight ends were still seen as tight ends.

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  • Greg - September 12 2013 12:44 PM

    Steve Sabol's dad just got in a couple of years ago. I'm not saying he's not worthy, but you have a bunch of guys who should get in before Steve. My early picks are: Will Shields, Michael Strahan, Derrick Brooks, Charles Haley, Paul Tag, along with Ray Guy and Humphries.

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  • Adam - September 12 2013 12:41 PM

    I am so tired of Mark Bavaro being the only tight end nominee. He doesn't deserve it. Everyone who is honest will admit that the Giants won their Super Bowls on the backs of Lawrence Taylor, Harry Carson, Leonard Marshall and the rest of the defense. Mark Bavaro was only selected to two Pro Bowls. He only played with the Giants for six years before finishing with marginal success in three seasons split between Philadelphia and Cleveland. A nine year career, with three or four prime years for a tight end in the modern era does not deserve consideration. Another tight end in the same conference who played at the same time has individual numbers and individual accolades that far surpass anything Mark Bavaro did. Steve Jordan was A seventh-round draft choice out of Brown University of the Ivy League in 1982. In 1985 Jordan had a career high 68 catches and the next season he was selected to his first of six straight Pro Bowls; 1986-91, the years that Bavaro won his Super Bowls. Among the tight ends that have received serious consideration for the Hall of Fame and haven't been inducted, Jordan has more receiving yards and more Pro Bowl selections than five of them (Mark Bavaro, Todd Christensen, Ben Coates, Russ Francis and Brent Jones), and more receptions than all of them with the exception of Ben Coates. Steve also went to more Pro Bowls than six of the eight modern era tight ends who have been inducted (Dave Casper, Mike Ditka, John Mackey, Ozzie Newsome, Jackie Smith, Kellen Winslow, Charlie Sanders, and Shannon Sharpe) and also had more career catches than all but Newsome, Winslow and Sharpe. Steve Jordan did all of this with Tommy Kramer, Steve Dils, Wade Wilson, Rich Gannon, Sean Salisbury, and Jim McMahon throwing him passes. The time has come to stop overstating Bavaro's accomplishments and recognize how great of a tight end Steve Jordan was in the last era where tight ends were still seen as tight ends.

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  • Michael - September 12 2013 12:38 PM

    @Jeffery D Jackson. This list of names is the ''modern era'' list for players who retired no later than 25 years ago (1989 season). All the names you mentioned are now in the Seniors pool and are not part of this selection process. If you look at the 3rd paragraph of this story you will also see that Ray Guy has been named as one of the two Seniors Committee nominations for next year's Class, alongside Claude Humphrey. The Class of 2014 will be selected from the list of the 15 modern-era finalists plus the two senior nominees (former Oakland/Los Angeles Raiders punter Ray Guy and former Atlanta Falcons and Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Claude Humphrey) who were selected last month by the Hall of Fame’s Senior Selection Committee.

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  • Adam - September 12 2013 12:33 PM

    I am so tired of Mark Bavaro being the only tight end nominee. He doesn't deserve it. Everyone who is honest will admit that the Giants won their Super Bowls on the backs of Lawrence Taylor, Harry Carson, Leonard Marshall and the rest of the defense. Mark Bavaro was only selected to two Pro Bowls. He only played with the Giants for six years before finishing with marginal success in three seasons split between Philadelphia and Cleveland. A nine year career, with three or four prime years for a tight end in the modern era does not deserve consideration. Another tight end in the same conference who played at the same time has individual numbers and individual accolades that far surpass anything Mark Bavaro did. Steve Jordan was A seventh-round draft choice out of Brown University of the Ivy League in 1982. In 1985 Jordan had a career high 68 catches and the next season he was selected to his first of six straight Pro Bowls; 1986-91, the years that Bavaro won his Super Bowls. Among the tight ends that have received serious consideration for the Hall of Fame and haven't been inducted, Jordan has more receiving yards and more Pro Bowl selections than five of them (Mark Bavaro, Todd Christensen, Ben Coates, Russ Francis and Brent Jones), and more receptions than all of them with the exception of Ben Coates. Steve also went to more Pro Bowls than six of the eight modern era tight ends who have been inducted (Dave Casper, Mike Ditka, John Mackey, Ozzie Newsome, Jackie Smith, Kellen Winslow, Charlie Sanders, and Shannon Sharpe) and also had more career catches than all but Newsome, Winslow and Sharpe. Steve Jordan did all of this with Tommy Kramer, Steve Dils, Wade Wilson, Rich Gannon, Sean Salisbury, and Jim McMahon throwing him passes. The time has come to stop overstating Bavaro's accomplishments and recognize how great of a tight end Steve Jordan was in the last era where tight ends were still seen as tight ends.

    reported

  • jack umlauf - September 12 2013 08:22 AM

    How about Jack Kemp for the HOF

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  • Jeffery D Jackson - September 12 2013 07:06 AM

    @David....so did Drew Pearson & he's not on this list nor are ALL 70's Safeties Cliff Harris & Charlie Waters I didn't see Ray Guy????? He is the greatest punter in the hx of the game!

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  • Michael - September 11 2013 11:59 PM

    There are still quite a few names who are at least worthy of a nomination and for one reason or another have not been listed, while others leave you scratching your head as to how they even got this far. Dave Meggett and Stephen Davis at RB, but no Corey Dillon, is just silly. I'm not saying these guys should be HOFers but at the very least deserve the recognition of a preliminary list nomination. Some of them might even make good Seniors candidates further down the road. RB: Corey Dillon 11,241 yds, seven 1,000 yd seasons, 89 career TDs WR: Irving Fryar 851-12,785 with 84 career TDs which were great numbers for his era. OL: Richmond Webb Webb is a 4 times (2 1st team) All Pro/7 Pro Bowls/90s All Decade Team. TE: Jay Novacek 5 Pro Bowls and 2-time All-Pro with 3 Super Bowl rings. TE: Keith Jackson 5 Pro Bowls and 4-time All Pro (3 1st team). DL: Leslie O’Neal, Neil Smith, Keith Millard, Simeon Rice, Clyde Simmons. Millard was 2nd team All Decade 1980s for the Vikings. O’Neal, Smith, Rice and Simmons were all All-Pros with 100+ career sacks. O’Neal has 132.5 career sacks and 8 seasons with 10+ sacks. Smith and Rice also won Super Bowl rings which is an extra feather in their cap. LB: Pat Swilling 4(2AP)/5/90s, Greg Lloyd 3(3AP)/5/none, Hardy Nickerson 4(2AP)/5/90s DB: Deron Cherry, Frank Minnifield and Carnell Lake. Cherry is a 5(3AP)/6/80s. Carnell Lake, a 4(1AP)/5/90s and Minnifield 3(1AP)/4/80s. All 3 deserved to be nominated.

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  • David - September 11 2013 11:17 PM

    It should also be highlighted that Rod Smith did his whole deal as an Undrafted Player

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  • John - September 11 2013 09:44 PM

    How are you not gonna put a 6 time pro bowler and great player like Hardy Nickerson on this list???? Definitely the most overlooked linebacker of the last 3 decades.

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