EMMITT SMITH

EMMITT SMITH

Class of 2010
Running Back >>> 5-9, 207
(Florida)
1990-2002 Dallas Cowboys, 2003-04 Arizona Cardinals

Selected by Dallas in first round (17th player overall), 1990 … Won rushing crowns in 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995 … Led NFL in rushing touchdowns three times … Major contributor to Cowboys Super Bowl XXVII, XXVIII, XXX victories … Named first-team All-Pro 1992-95 … In 1993, named NFL’s MVP and MVP in Super Bowl XXVIII … 11 straight 1,000-yard seasons … Became NFL’s all-time rushing leader in 2002 … Career totals: 18,355 yards and 164 touchdowns rushing; also had 515 receptions … Born May 15, 1969 in Pensacola, Florida.

The Dallas Cowboys were rebuilding when they selected Florida running back Emmitt Smith in the first round of the 1990 draft. After a holdout during all of training camp and preseason of his rookie season, Smith reported to the Cowboys in time for the start of the regular season. He wasted no time in proving he was going to be a huge part of the team’s future.

Smith rushed for 937 yards and scored 11 touchdowns to earn Offensive Rookie of the Year honors and the first of eight career Pro Bowl nods. He followed that season by rushing for a league-leading 1,563 yards. Smith won four rushing crowns during a five-year span as he added titles in 1992, 1993, and 1995. He also led the NFL in rushing touchdowns three times and contributed 277 pass receptions during that same five-season period.

His best year came in 1995 when he recorded career highs for rushing yards (1,773), rushing touchdowns (25), and receptions (62).

Not surprisingly, Smith’s impact on the team helped nurture the Cowboys back to the top of the NFL. The Cowboys, with their star runner leading the way, won three Super Bowls over four seasons from 1992 to 1995. Smith was named first-team All-Pro in each year during that four-year period. In 1993, he was named the NFL’s MVP and followed that by earning Most Valuable Player honors in the Cowboys’ 30-13 win over the Buffalo Bills in Super Bowl XXVIII.

After narrowly missing the 1,000-yard mark as a rookie, Smith embarked on a record run of 11 straight seasons with 1,000 yards rushing. His streak came to end in Smith’s final season in Dallas in 2002 when he missed the 1,000-yard mark by a mere 25 yards. However, that season was highlighted by one particular game against the Seattle Seahawks on Oct. 27, 2002. In that contest, Smith supplanted Walter Payton as the NFL’s all-time rushing leader.

Smith, who was named to the NFL’s All-Decade Team of the 1990s, finished his 226-game career by playing two final seasons with the Arizona Cardinals. He retired with a career total of 18,355 yards and a NFL record 164 rushing touchdowns. He also added 515 receptions for 3,224 yards and 11 touchdowns.

Year Team G No. Yds. Avg. TD No. Yds. Avg. TD
1990 Dallas 16 241 937 3.9 11 24 228 9.5 0
1991 Dallas 16 365 1563 4.3 12 49 258 5.3 1
1992 Dallas 16 373 1713 4.6 18 59 335 5.7 1
1993 Dallas 14 283 1486 5.3 9 57 414 7.3 1
1994 Dallas 15 368 1484 4.0 21 50 341 6.8 1
1995 Dallas 16 377 1773 4.7 25 62 375 6.0 0
1996 Dallas 15 327 1204 3.7 12 47 249 5.3 3
1997 Dallas 16 261 1074 4.1 4 40 234 5.9 0
1998 Dallas 16 319 1332 4.2 13 27 175 6.5 2
1999 Dallas 15 329 1397 4.2 11 27 119 4.4 2
2000 Dallas 16 294 1203 4.1 9 11 79 7.2 0
2001 Dallas 14 261 1021 3.9 3 17 116 6.8 0
2002 Dallas 16 254 975 3.8 5 16 89 5.6 0
2003 Arizona 10 90 256 2.8 2 14 107 7.6 0
2004 Arizona 15 267 937 3.5 9 15 105 7.0 0
Career Total 226 4,409 18,355 4.2 164 515 3224 6.3 11
Additional Career Statistics: Passing: 1-1-21, 1 TD; Two-Point Conversions: 1

Championship Games

1992 NFC – Dallas Cowboys 30, San Francisco 49ers 20
Smith started at running back. He had 24 carries for 114 yards and one touchdown. He also had seven receptions for 59 yards and one touchdown.

1993 NFC – Dallas Cowboys 38, San Francisco 49ers 21
Smith started at running back. He had 23 carries for 88 yards and one touchdown. He also had seven receptions for 85 yards and one touchdown.

1994 NFC – San Francisco 49ers 38, Dallas Cowboys 28
Smith started at running back. He had 20 carries for 74 yards and two touchdowns. He also had three receptions for five yards.

1995 NFCDallas Cowboys 38, Green Bay Packers 27
Smith started at running back. He had 35 rushes for 150 yards and three touchdowns. He also had two receptions for 17 yards.

Super Bowls

Super Bowl XXVII – Dallas Cowboys 52, Buffalo Bills 17
Smith started at running back. He had 22 carries for 108 yards and one touchdown. He also had six receptions for 27 yards.

Super Bowl XXVIII – Dallas Cowboys 30, Buffalo Bills 13
Smith started at running back. He had 30 carries for 132 yards and two touchdowns. He also had four receptions for 26 yards. He was named the game’s Most Valuable Player.

Super Bowl XXX – Dallas Cowboys 27, Pittsburgh Steelers 17
Smith started at running back. He had 18 carries for 49 yards and two touchdowns. He also had one reception for three yards.

All-Pro: 1992 (AP, PFWA, NEA, SN), 1993 (AP, PFWA, SN), 1994 (AP, PFWA, SN), 1995 (AP, PFWA, SN)

All-Pro Second Team: 1991 (AP, NEA)

All-NFC: 1991 (UPI, PW), 1992 (UPI, PW), 1993 (UPI, PW), 1994 (UPI, PW), 1995 (UPI, PW)

All-NFC Second Team: 1996 (UPI)

(8) – 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994*, 1995*, 1996, 1999, 2000

* Did not play

(at time of his retirement following 2004 season)

• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Career – 4,409
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Career – 18,355
• [1st] Most Seasons, 1,000 or More Yards Rushing – 11
• [1st] Most Consecutive Seasons, 1,000 or More Yards Rushing – 11 (1991-2001)
• [1st] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Career – 78
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career – 164
• [1st] Most Combined Attempts, Career – 4,939
• [2nd] Most Touchdowns, Career – 175
• [2nd] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Season – 25 (1995)
• [2nd] Most Yards from Scrimmage, Career – 21,579
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Seasons Leading League in Touchdowns – 3 (1992, 1994-95)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Seasons Leading League in Rushing – 4 (1991-93, 1995)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading League in Rushing – 3 (1991-93)
• [3rd] Most Touchdowns, Season – 25 (1995)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Seasons Leading League in Rushing Attempts – 3 (1991, 1994-95)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Season – 11 (1995)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Seasons Leading League in Rushing Touchdowns – 3 (1992, 1994-95)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Consecutive Games with Rushing Touchdown – 11 (1994-95, 1995)

Super Bowl Records
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career – 5
• [2nd] Most Points, Career – 30
• [2nd] Most Touchdowns, Career – 5
• [2nd] Most Rushing Attempts, Career – 70
• [2nd] Most Combined Attempts, Career – 81
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Touchdowns, Game – 2 (vs. Buffalo, Super Bowl XXVIII; vs. Pittsburgh, Super Bowl XXX)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game – 2 (vs. Buffalo, Super Bowl XXVIII; vs. Pittsburgh, Super Bowl XXX)
• [3rd] Most Rushing Yards Gained, Career – 289
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Combined Attempts, Game – 34 (vs. Buffalo, Super Bowl XXVIII)

Postseason Records
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Career – 1,586
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career – 19
• [Tied for 1st] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing – 7
• [Tied for 1st] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Rushing Touchdown – 8 (1993-1996)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Attempts, Career – 349
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Touchdowns, Career – 21
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Touchdowns, Game – 3 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996 – NFC championship)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Touchdown – 8 (1993-96)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game – 3 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996 – NFC championship)
• [3rd] Most Combined Attempts, Career – 397
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Points Scored, Career – 126

Cowboys records held by Smith
(Records through the 2002 season, Smith’s final season with Dallas)

• [1st] Most Points Scored, Career – 986
• [1st] Most Points Scored, Season – 150 (1995)
• [1st] Most Seasons Leading Team in Touchdowns – 11
• [1st] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading Team in Touchdowns – 7 (1990-96)
• [1st] Most Touchdowns Scored, Career – 164
• [1st] Most Touchdowns Scored, Season – 25 (1995)
• [1st] Most Consecutive Touchdowns Scored – 11 (1994-95; 1995)
• [1st] Most Seasons Leading Team in Rushing – 13
• [1st] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading Team in Rushing – 13 (1990-2002)
• [1st] Most Consecutive Games Leading Team in Rushing – 41 (1994-96)
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Career – 4,052
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Season – 377 (1995)
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Rookie Season – 241 (1990)
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Game – 35 (vs. N.Y. Giants, Nov. 7, 1994)
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Career – 17,162
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Season – 1,773 (1995)
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Game – 237 (at Philadelphia, Oct. 31, 1993)
• [1st] Most Seasons, 1,000 or More Yards Rushing – 11
• [1st] Most Consecutive Seasons, 1,000 or More Yards Rushing – 11 (1991-2001)
• [1st] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Career – 76
• [1st] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Season – 11 (1995)
• [1st] Most Seasons Leading Team in Rushing Touchdowns – 13
• [1st] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading Team in Rushing Touchdowns – 13 (1990-2002)
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Career – 153
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Season – 25 (1995)
• [1st] Most Consecutive Rushing Touchdowns Scored – 11 (1994-95; 1995)
• [1st] Most Seasons Leading the Team in Combined Net Yards – 10
• [1st] Most Combined Net Attempts, Career – 4,538
• [1st] Most Combined Net Attempts, Season – 439 (1995)
• [1st] Most Combined Net Attempts, Game – 42 (at N.Y. Giants, Jan. 2, 1994)
• [1st] Most Combined Net Yards, Career – 20,174
• [1st] Most Combined Net Yards, Season – 2,148 (1995)
• [Tied for 1st] Most Points Scored, Game – 24 (vs. Phoenix, Dec. 16, 1990; at N.Y. Giants, Sept. 4, 1995)
• [Tied for 1st] Most Touchdowns Scored, Game – 4 (vs. Phoenix, Dec. 16, 1990; at N.Y. Giants, Sept. 4, 1995)
• [Tied for 1st] Most Consecutive Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing – 4 (1995 {twice})
• [Tied for 1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Game – 4 (vs. Phoenix, Dec. 16, 1990; at N.Y. Giants, Sept. 4, 1995)
• [2nd] Most Games Started, Career – 199
• [2nd] Most Touchdowns Scored, Season – 22 (1994)
• [2nd] Most Touchdowns Scored, Rookie Season – 11 (1990)
• [2nd] Most Consecutive Touchdowns Scored – 9 (1993-94; 1998-1999)
• [2nd] Most Consecutive Games Leading Team in Rushing – 32 (1990-92)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Attempts, Season – 373 (1992)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Attempts, Game – 34 (at Washington, Nov. 24, 1991)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Yards, Season – 1,713 (1992)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Season – 21 (1994)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Rookie Season – 11 (1990)
• [2nd] Most Consecutive Rushing Touchdowns Scored – 7 (1994)
• [2nd] Most Pass Receptions, Game – 12 (at Phoenix, Nov. 22, 1992)
• [2nd] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading the Team in Combined Net Yards – 7 (1990-96)
• [2nd] Most Combined Net Attempts, Season – 433 (1992)
• [2nd] Most Combined Net Attempts, Game – 39 (at Green Bay, Oct. 6, 1991)
• [2nd] Most Combined Net Yards, Season – 2,048 (1992)
• [2nd] Most Points Scored, Season – 132 (1994)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading Team in Touchdowns – 4 (1998-2001)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Season – 9 (1999)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Seasons, 50 or More Pass Receptions – 4 (1992-95)
• [3rd] Most Touchdowns Scored, Season – 19 (1992)
• [3rd] Most Rushing Attempts, Season – 368 (1994)
• [3rd] Highest Average Gain Per Rushing Attempt, Season – 5.25 (1993)
• [3rd] Most Rushing Touchdowns Scored, Season – 18 (1992)
• [3rd] Most Combined Net Attempts, Season – 418 (1994)
• [3rd] Most Combined Net Attempts, Game – 38 (at Cleveland, Sept. 1, 1991; vs. N.Y. Giants, Nov. 7, 1994; vs. Green Bay, Nov. 24, 1994)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing, Season – 8 (1991)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Consecutive Seasons Leading the Team in Combined Net Yards – 3 (1998-2000)

Postseason Records

• [1st] Most Points Scored, Career – 126
• [1st] Most Touchdowns, Career – 21
• [1st] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Touchdown – 8 (1993-96)
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Career – 349
• [1st] Most Rushing Attempts, Game – 35 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996)
• [1st] Most Rushing Yards, Career – 1,586
• [1st] Longest Rush From Scrimmage – 65 (at Minnesota, Jan. 9, 2000)
• [1st] Most Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing – 7
• [1st] Most Consecutive Games, 100 or More Yards Rushing – 3 (1992)
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Career – 19
• [1st] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Rushing Touchdown – 8 (1993-96)
• [1st] Most Rushing Touchdowns, Game – 3 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996)
• [Tied for 1st] Most Points Scored, Game – 18 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996)
• [Tied for 1st] Most Touchdowns, Game – 3 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996)
• [2nd] Most Rushing Yards, Game – 150 (vs. Green Bay, Jan. 14, 1996)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Rushing Touchdown – 3 (1992)
• [Tied for 2nd] Most Rushing Attempts, Game – 30 (vs. Buffalo, Super Bowl XXVIII)
• [3rd] Highest Average Gain Per Rushing Attempt, Career – 4.54
• [3rd] Highest Average Gain Per Rushing Attempt, Game – 6.82 (vs. Minnesota, Dec. 28, 1996)
• [Tied for 3rd] Most Consecutive Games Scoring a Touchdown – 3 (1992)

NFL Statistical Championships
Scoring Titles: 1995
Touchdown Leader: 1992, 1994, 1995
Rushing Titles: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995

NFC Statistical Championships
Scoring Titles: 1995
Touchdown Leader: 1992, 1994, 1995

Rushing Titles: 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995

Team Statistical Championships
Rushing Titles: 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004A
Scoring Titles: 1994, 1995, 1999

A Arizona Cardinals All other titles with Dallas Cowboys

• 1990s All-Decade Team
• 1990 Offensive Rookie of the Year (AP, PW)
• 1993 Most Valuable Player (AP, PFWA, SN, MX)
• 1993 Offensive Player of the Year (PW)
• 1993 NFC Offensive Player of the Year (UPI)
• Super Bowl XXVIII MVP

Year Team W L T Division Finish
1990 Dallas Cowboys 7 9 0 4
1991 Dallas Cowboys 11 5 0 2
1992 Dallas Cowboys 13 3 0 1
1993 Dallas Cowboys 12 4 0 1
1994 Dallas Cowboys 12 4 0 1
1995 Dallas Cowboys 12 4 0 1
1996 Dallas Cowboys 10 6 0 1
1997 Dallas Cowboys 6 10 0 4
1998 Dallas Cowboys 10 6 0 1
1999 Dallas Cowboys 8 8 0 2
2000 Dallas Cowboys 5 11 0 4
2001 Dallas Cowboys 5 11 0 5
2002 Dallas Cowboys 5 11 0 4
2003 Arizona Cardinals 4 12 0 4
2004 Arizona Cardinals 6 10 0 3

 

 

Full Name: Emmitt James Smith, III

Birthdate: May 15, 1969

Birthplace: Pensacola, Florida

High School: Escambia (Pensacola, FL)

Elected to Pro Football Hall of Fame: February 6, 2010

Enshrined into Pro Football Hall of Fame: August 7, 2010

Presenter: Jerry Jones, Dallas Cowboys Owner, President and General Manager

Other Members of the Class of 2010: Russ GrimmRickey Jackson, Dick LeBeau, Floyd Little, John Randle, Jerry Rice

Pro Career: 15 seasons, 226 games

Drafted: 1st round (17th player overall) in 1990 by Dallas Cowboys

Transactions: March 26, 2003 – Smith signed as a free agent with Arizona Cardinals.

Uniform Number: #22

Pro Football Hall of Fame Field at Fawcett Stadium
August 7, 2010

START OF PRESENTER VIDEO
 

Jerry Jones (presenter): Emmitt Smith is Dallas Cowboy royality. He’s NFL royalty. Emmitt Smith’s about durability. He’s about dependability. He’s got the heart of a champion. I think it’s fair to say that a runner of his kind will not be seen again. No one will perform at that position, with that type of production, for that length of time again. It’s just too hard to do.

Our plan on draft day was to get a defensive player, and we had a couple of them in mind. And then if we drafted and had an opportunity with our second pick—get a bigger back—a pounding back. Of course, it was obvious as we sit here today that Emmitt was a pounding back. He knew and we all felt that he was gonna be a part of a team that was a championship team. Emmitt changed the game for the Dallas Cowboys.

Narrator (Steve Sabol):
Emmitt Smith was an indispensable part of the Dallas Cowboys team that won three Super Bowl titles in four years. He is the NFL all-time leader in rushing yards and rushing touchdowns. And in 1993, he became the only running back to ever win a Super Bowl, lead the league in rushing, be named league MVP and also be named Super Bowl MVP all in the same season.

Jones:
We were behind at halftime against Buffalo, in Atlanta, Georgia, for the second Super Bowl. Emmitt came out in the second half and made three running plays. When he made those plays, he went right to the heart of the matter and the heart of the Buffalo Bills as well. That closed the door to score that touchdown. When he went into the end zone, I started heading to the field for the celebration. He had his goal, he could see where he wanted to be and that was contagious.

Emmitt knew he was going to break the rushing record. Emmitt walks the walk. He not only is a man of conviction and a man of goals, but he wants to get there the right way. No short cuts for him. It wasn’t that way on the field and he wasn’t that way off the field. He knows every minute is a gift, and he gets the most out of it. Now that fires me up.

Where does a guy like Emmitt Smith come from? You can start with his mother, Mary, and her influence relative to setting goals and work ethic. You can start with his daddy, Emmitt.  That is about toughness, continuing to strive, get up when you’ve been knocked down. Emmitt Smith was blessed to have great parents and great parental coaching.

Emmitt Smith evokes in my heart and in my mind God’s will of taking advantage of every gift that you’ve been given. He hasn’t left a yard on the table of his life. He was a pro football player’s football player. He always showed up and gave you everything he had. Emmitt Smith is someone who’s a source of great pride for an entire generation of Dallas Cowboy football fans. The Pro Football Hall of Fame would not be complete without Emmitt Smith.

I am honored to present Emmitt Smith for induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

END OF VIDEO

Emmitt Smith:
Thank you to my Lord and savior Jesus Christ for blessing me to play the sport I so dearly love for almost three decades.

It is an honor to have achieved this level of success. Now I need to take a moment to reflect upon the people who have helped shape the foundation of who I am as a man and also a football player.

Whatever achievements I've earned over the course of my life clearly have not been due to (indiscernible), but also due to the belief and dedication of so many, the values and skills taught by my family, friends, teachers, coaches and mentors were fundamental to shaping me into the man I am today.

At the age of 21, I already knew what I needed to do in order to make my mark. I wanted to become the all-time leading rusher. I knew Walter Payton was one of the best to have ever played the game, and I wanted to achieve that level of greatness.

He established an insurmountable record to shoot for. He was the prototype for me as a champion athlete and runningback. He had my size, he was my build. He had a heart that said, I can achieve, I will achieve, I will be successful.

Now here I am standing at the same podium he did, being inducted into the 2010 Hall of Fame. And you know what, I am, I am, I am now the all-time leading rusher (smiling). Wow, what an honor.

A profound thank you to Mr. Jerry Jones and the Jones family for believing in a kid from Pensacola, Florida, who was 5'9" and a half, who people said was not big enough or fast enough action and for giving me opportunities to play for the team that I always wanted to play for, America's Team, the Dallas Cowboys.

This team means more to me than just another professional football team. That's why I always did everything in my power to help make this organization and team the very best it could possibly be. So, Jerry, thank you for believing in me as a football player and knowing that I can get the job done.

But, Jerry, because I am a man of faith, I know our relationship did not happen by accident. I know it was ordained by God. And because of this, He has predestined me to do great things in life. The Dallas Cowboys have given me that platform. That's one of the reasons why I love this organization and the Jones family so much. Because what you have been able to do for my family and me throughout my football career and to this day, thank you so much.

Thank you to my high school coach Dwight Thomas for teaching me how to set goals, become a team player, and to shine the spotlight upon others such as my offensive linemen. Thank you to Jimmy Nichols, my offensive coordinator out of high school. You pushed me and helped make me into the runningback I became. You set the foundation by teaching me I could never carry the football for you or anyone else if I fumbled. You made it very clear to me that the football was the most important thing on the football field. Both Dwight Thomas and Jimmy Nichols pushed me to a level of greatness at an early age. I began to realize what it would take for me to become successful. I also understood that my job and my role as a teammate had to be fulfilled by all the work that we all put in to what we was trying to get accomplished. So thank you, guys. From Escambia High School to this point for being there and helping me get to this point.

Thank you to Norv Turner for bringing a system that allowed Michael, Troy, me and our offense to flourish. Thank you to Jimmy Johnson for bringing discipline, focus, commitment and your expectation to our team. You propelled us to do great things in life. You set the bar very high and not only demanded that we leaped over it, but, Jimmy, you showed us how. You knew your players were capable of achieving the standard you set for us. You knew we could claim our greatness. It's what drove us to become the team we became.

Thank you to all of the fans, especially the Dallas Cowboys fans in Dallas, throughout the United States and around the world. You have always been there supporting us. When things got rough and we needed your energy, you provided it. When we became victorious, it was your energy that lifted us as you celebrated with us. Without a doubt, you are as much a part of America's Team as the players are.

To Michael and Troy, would you both please stand. It has truly, truly, truly been an honor to go into battle with two of the greatest champions I've ever played with. Without you there is no me. That is why we are called the triplets. You cannot have one without the other.

Troy, your leadership, dedication and focus helped me become a better football player because I did not want to let you down.

Michael, your work ethic, your passion, your love for this sport helped me learn to train and prepare myself differently.

Thank you both for the invaluable contributions you have made to my life.

Daryl Johnston, where are you? Will you please stand? You mean the world to me (tearing up) not just because we shared the same backfield, but because you sacrificed so much for me. People don't understand what it took to be a fullback in our system, the sacrifices you made not simply with your body but your whole spirit. You took care of me as though you were taking care of your little brother. Without you, without you, I know today would not have been possible. I love you from the bottom of my heart.

When I was six years old, I was watching the Dallas Cowboys on television with my father and some of our relatives. I clearly remember turning to my father and saying, One day I'm going to play professional football and I'm going to play for the Dallas Cowboys.

My father turned to me and said, sure, that would be a good goal for you to have, son. But after that night, I began to dream about it. My father's words supported me.  His words gave me the permission I needed to live in the dream. I began to feed the dream with my passion and dedication. I loved the sport so much, all I wanted to do was just play it. It didn't matter to me what position I played; I just loved being out there.

From that young age, many factors were already present in contributing to the fulfillment of my dream. For example, I began to play football in the park with my older cousins, Morris, Tim and Jeffrey, Jerome and Edward, across the street from my grandmother's house.

Now, in 1990, I'm on the verge of doing something I always wanted to do as a child: Play professional football. However, the Dallas Cowboys did not have a pick in the top 10. I was projected to go in the top 10. Had I been chosen when I thought I would be, I very likely would have been drafted by Tampa Bay or Seattle: Not the team of my childhood dream.

But pick after pick went by and I fell into the bottom half of the top 20. I was down in Pensacola watching the draft with my family agonizing about why didn't I go in the top 10? Then, finally, words start blowing in the wind, the Dallas Cowboys are trying to move up and make a trade. They had moved up to pick me as the 17th pick in the first round. Here I am thinking, Wow, how awesome this would be, how great it would be to be able to play for the Dallas Cowboys.

Then I got a call from Jimmy Johnson saying, Emmitt, how would you like to wear a star on your helmet? My dreams, my passion, my emotions were running so high. Jerry, I could not believe that this was actually happening to me.

While playing for the Dallas Cowboys, balance was the key to our success. We had a winning strategy and a spiritual purpose as a team. We also had a collective goal, mental toughness and trust. When it came down to the third and fourth quarters, my offensive linemen knew what was about to go down. Right now I would like to thank them. If you're in the audience as I call out your name, would you please stand.

Andre Gurode, Derek Kannard, Flosell Adams, Larry Allen, Frank Cornish, Ron Stone, John Gesek, George Hegman, Erik Williams, Everett McIvar, Kelvin Garmon, Kevin Gogan, Mark Stepnoski, and the late Mark Tuinei who obviously cannot be here. Nate Newton, Ray Donaldson, and Solomon Page. The names I have not mentioned, you know who you are. Thank you for blessing me with the running lanes you created. You were the very best I ever ran behind.

In addition to the acknowledgments I am privileged to make today, this moment creates a unique opportunity, an opportunity to share critical life principles. The first and most important principle is to be of service. The hardest service is for everyone. The second principle is we all need a championship strategy to guide us to help make those dreams come true. The third principle is, claim your inner champion. When you claim your inner champion, you will learn to see, hear and feel differently than others. So what I most want to convey here is, never, never let others define you; you define yourself.

Now let's talk about some specific steps I took that were critical to sustaining my vision. There's a difference between merely having a dream and fulfilling a vision. Most people only dream. I only not had my childhood dream, but I did everything in my power to fulfill it.

For example, I wrote down my goals and how I was going to achieve them because Dwight Thomas used to tell us, It's only a dream until you write it down, and then it becomes a goal. By the time I was 20, I wrote, I want to play in the Super Bowl, be the MVP, become the all-time leading rusher, and finish college, because I promised my mother I would.

Over the course of my career, all of those things came to pass, and I know that writing down my goals was an essential strategy.

Another critical principle is consistency. Consistency shows value. Consistency is necessary for trust, durability and longevity. You have to show up every week no matter how difficult the game or life might be.

I not only showed consistency, but I did everything in my power to be the best that I possibly could. Over time consistency will allow you to achieve your goals.

Next is balance. As I stated earlier, balance was the key to our success. We had all the balance you could possibly have. I exhibit balance in my personal life when I put my family in its proper place, and that is number one.

Standing before you today, I know this is real. I know it's not a dream. But it almost feels surreal. When I was told on February 6th that I was being inducted into the 2010 Hall of Fame, I was struck by a vision. I actually saw the clouds parting and a door opening. I saw all of these Hall of Famers here and the ones who have passed on before us standing with their arms open wide welcoming me into the hall. Perhaps all of you have been wondering why I have not yet spoken of my family. God has blessed me with an amazing family. And as I call out your names, would you please stand.

My father Emmitt James Smith, Jr., my mother, Mary Smith.My sisters Marsha and Connie. My brothers, Eric, Emory, and my late brother Emil. My brothers-in-law Victor and Rick. My sister-in-law Pam. And to Mr. Henry Southall, my loving father-in-law. I will continue to do everything in my power to keep your daughter and my wife safe and happy. Thank you all for your love and your support. You may be seated.

To my beautiful wife Pat, would you please stand. Thank you for smoothing off some of the rough edges and showing me how to become a better man. You complete me, babe. You make everything that I have worth living for. I love you so much.

To my kids, Jasmine, Rheagan, EJ, Skylar, and my soon-to-be fifth child, I love all of you very, very much. I apologize if I cannot be there for everything, but please know this: Dad is doing the very best that he can. Thank you.

Before closing, I would like to share one final story with you. Some time ago I had an older person come up to me and he said, Do you know who is the greatest runningback out of Pensacola that nobody has ever seen?

Well, I played in the National Football League and I had accomplished quite a bit. I thought perhaps he was talking about me. However, he went on to explain, your father was a heck of a running back. This was a revelation to me. Of course, I knew my father had played ball, but I never knew he was that good.

Now fast forward in time to February the 6th, the day before Super Bowl XLIV  there we were, my father and I sitting together. When he turned to me and said, Son, I am so proud of you, I had dreams of doing what you're doing, but my mom got sick and I never did get a chance to go to college. He said, You're living my dreams, you're living my dream. And all I could think about was, I'm living your dream, I'm fulfilling my dream, and I'm fulfilling God's purpose for my life.

Now when I go into the hall today, I'm not going in alone. You see, I'm carrying my grandfather, I'm carrying my father, and I'm carrying my son along with me because I bear all of their names.

Now I can say to my dad and my son EJ, our name will be forever enshrined in the history of football. Thank you for being here today to share this experience with me and may God truly bless all of you.

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