Class of 2005 Finalists Announced

01/11/2005


For Immediate Release                                     For More Information, Contact

January 11, 2005                                              Joe Horrigan at (330) 456-8207

15 FINALISTS FOR HALL OF FAME ELECTION

Canton, OH – Michael Irvin, Dan Marino, Derrick Thomas, and Steve Young, four first -year eligible candidates, are among the 15 finalists who will be considered for election to the Pro Football Hall of Fame when the Hall’s Board of Selectors meet in Jacksonville, Florida on Saturday, February 5. 

Joining the four first-year eligible players as finalists are eight other modern-era players, a highly successful team/league administrator, and two players nominated earlier by the Hall of Fame’s Senior Committee.  The Senior Committee nominees, who were announced in August 2004, are Benny Friedman and Fritz Pollard.  The other modern-era player finalists include defensive ends Richard Dent, Claude Humphrey, and L.C. Greenwood; linebacker Harry Carson; offensive linemen Russ Grimm and Bob Kuechenberg; cornerback Roger Wehrli; and wide receiver Art Monk.  The team/league administrator is George Young. 

To be elected, a finalist must receive a minimum positive vote of 80 percent.

Listed alphabetically, the 15 finalists with their positions, teams, and years active follow:         

  • Harry Carson – Linebacker – 1976-1988 New York Giants
  • Richard Dent – Defensive End – 1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears,
    1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles
  • Benny Friedman – Quarterback – 1927 Cleveland Bulldogs, 1928 Detroit Wolverines, 1929-1931 New York Giants, 1932-1934 Brooklyn Dodgers
  • L.C. Greenwood – Defensive End – 1969-1981 Pittsburgh Steelers
  • Russ Grimm – Guard – 1981-1991 Washington Redskins
  • Claude Humphrey – Defensive End – 1968-1978 Atlanta Falcons,
    1979-1981 Philadelphia Eagles
  • Michael Irvin – Wide Receiver – 1988-1999 Dallas Cowboys
  • Bob Kuechenberg – Guard – 1970-1984 Miami Dolphins
  • Dan Marino – Quarterback – 1983-1999 Miami Dolphins
  • Art Monk – Wide Receiver – 1980-1993 Washington Redskins, 1994 New York Jets, 1995 Philadelphia Eagles
  • Fritz Pollard – Back/Coach – 1919-1921, 1925-1926 Akron Pros/Indians, 1922 Milwaukee Badgers, 1923-1924 Gilberton Cadamounts (independent pro team), 1923, 1925 Hammond Pros, 1925 Providence Steam Roller
  • Derrick Thomas – Linebacker 1989-1999 Kansas City Chiefs
  • Roger Wehrli – Cornerback – 1969-1982 St. Louis Cardinals 
  • George Young – Contributor – 1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-1978 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League
  • Steve Young – Quarterback – 1985-1986 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1987-1999 San Francisco 49ers            

Carson, Dent, Greenwood, Humphrey, Kuechenberg, Monk, and George Young have all been finalists in previous years.  Although they have been eligible prior to this year, this is the first time that Friedman, Grimm, Pollard, and Wehrli have been finalists.

From this year’s list, eight players – Carson, Greenwood, Grimm, Irvin, Kuechenberg, Marino, Thomas, and Wehrli – spent their entire NFL career with just one team. 

Friedman and Pollard were selected as senior candidates by the Hall of Fame’s Seniors Committee at their August 2004 meeting.  The Seniors Committee reviews the qualifications of those players, coaches, and contributors whose careers took place more than 25 years ago.  The remaining 13 modern-era finalists were determined by a vote of the Hall’s 39-member Board of Selectors from a list of 90 preliminary nominees that earlier was reduced to a list of 25 semi-finalists.  To be eligible for election, modern-era players must be retired at least five years while a coach needs only to be retired. 

The Board of Selectors will meet in Jacksonville, Florida on Saturday, February 5, 2005, to elect the Hall of Fame Class of 2005.  To be elected, a finalist must receive a minimum positive vote of 80 percent.

At the 2005 election meeting, the selectors will thoroughly discuss the careers of each finalist before narrowing the field to six candidates.  At least three candidates must be elected but the total class cannot number more than six.

Of the 2005 finalists, Friedman and Pollard have been eligible 43 years, Greenwood and Humphrey 19 years, Wehrli 18 years, Kuechenberg 16 years, Carson 12, Grimm nine years, Monk five years, Dent three years, and for Irvin, Marino, Thomas, and Steve Young 2005 is their first year of eligibility. 

The Class of 2005 will be announced at a press conference at 12 noon (ET) on Saturday, February 5, at the Super Bowl media center in the Prime Osborn Convention Center.

Representatives of the accounting firm Deloitte & Touche will tabulate all votes during the meeting.  At the press conference, they will present Hall of Fame President John Bankert with an envelope containing the names of the nominees elected.  The Hall will contact each new member immediately after the announcement.  Members of the Class of 2005 in Jacksonville for the Super Bowl will be asked to join the press conference.  Those not able to attend will be asked to join via teleconference.

Enshrinement of the Class of 2005 will take place at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, on Sunday, August 7, 2005.

NOTE: Detailed biographies and statistics for the 15 finalists as well as photos are available on the Pro Football Hall of Fame's media website: Profootballhof.com/media
(User Name: canton; Password: canton. . .case sensitive, please user lowercase).

CLASS OF 2005 15 FINALISTS

Harry Carson

Linebacker . . . 6-2, 237. . .South Carolina State. . . 1976-1988 New York Giants . . . 13 seasons, 173 games. . . Giants’ fourth-round draft pick (105th player overall), 1976 NFL Draft. . .Defensive end in college . . . Became Giants’ starting middle linebacker halfway through rookie season. . .Earned All-Rookie honors. . .Led Giants defenders in tackles five seasons. . .Had career-high performance in 1982 vs. Green Bay, 20 solo tackles and five assists. . .Ferocious run stopper whose 14 career fumble recoveries ranks second in Giants’ record book. . . Known for his aggressive pursuit, he recorded 11 career interceptions . . .Was a part of the famed Giants linebacker trio of Carson, Lawrence Taylor, and Carl Banks. . .A big-play performer, his interception and 12 tackles vs. Redskins in 1986 virtually assured Giants of NFC East title. . .Made key goal line stand play in Super Bowl XXI when he stopped Broncos running back for no gain. . .Selected to play in nine Pro Bowls, including seven straight (1982-1988). . . All-Pro (first-team) 1981, 1984; (second-team) 1978, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1986. . . All-NFC (first-team) 1978, 1979, 1981, 1982, 1986; (second-team) 1978, 1985. . .Born November 26, 1953, in Florence, South Carolina.

Richard Dent

Defensive End. . .6-5, 265. . .Tennessee State. . .1983-1993, 1995 Chicago Bears, 1994 San Francisco 49ers, 1996 Indianapolis Colts, 1997 Philadelphia Eagles. . .15 seasons, 203 games. . .Selected by Chicago in eighth round (203rd player overall) of 1983 NFL Draft. . .Played in every game as rookie. . . Became full-time starter early in 1984. . .An intimidating player, could speed rush or power rush the quarterback. . .One of game’s premier pass rushers with 137.5 career sacks. . .Recorded double-digit sacks eight times including a streak of five consecutive years (1984-1988). . .Led NFC with team record 17.5 sacks, 1984. . .Following year, led NFL with 17 sacks as an integral part of Bears dominating defense. . .Earned Super Bowl XX MVP honors following Bears lopsided 46-10 win over Patriots. . .Career statistics include 8 interceptions (one touchdown), a safety, and fumble recovery for a touchdown. . .Named first- or second-team All-Pro four times, All-NFC five times. . . Selected to play in four Pro Bowls (1985, 1986, 1991, 1994). . .Born December 13, 1960 in Atlanta, Georgia.    

Benny Friedman

Quarterback . . . 5-10, 183 . . . Michigan . . . 1927 Cleveland Bulldogs, 1928 Detroit Wolverines, 1929-1931 New York Giants, 1932-1934 Brooklyn Dodgers . . . 8 seasons, 81 games . . . A two-time All-America choice. . . Was the game’s first great passer . . . Threw an NFL record 11 touchdown passes as a rookie in 1927 . . . Set another NFL record in 1929 with 20 touchdown passes . . . Led league in touchdown passes four consecutive years (1927-1930) . . . His 66 career touchdown passes was an NFL record until surpassed by Hall of Fame quarterback Arnie Herber in his 12th NFL season, 1944 . . .  First four pro seasons are legendary . . . Although no official statistics were kept, believed to have completed half of his passes (35% was considered good) . . . Triple-threat player, could run, pass, kick . . . Led league in scoring in 1928 . . . Giants owner Tim Mara purchased Detroit franchise to get Friedman for the Giants . . . A leg injury in 1931 and college coaching limited his play late in career . . . Born March 18, 1905 in Cleveland, Ohio . . . Died November 24, 1982.    

L. C. Greenwood

Defensive End . . . 6-6, 245. . . Arkansas AM&N . . . 1969-1981 Pittsburgh Steelers . . . 13 seasons, 170 games . . . Three-year regular, Ebony All-America in college. . .10th-round pick (238th player overall) in 1969 draft . . . Served as fifth defensive lineman first two years before becoming regular left defensive end in 1971 . . . Teamed with Hall of Famer Joe Greene, the left defensive tackle, to give Steelers superior left-side strength for their “Steel Curtain” defense . . . Consistent, possessed exceptional quickness, speed . . . Used height to knock down passes or force passers to rush throws . . . Noted for free-wheeling style as pass rusher . . . Had 73.5 sacks, 14 opponents fumble recoveries in career . . . Missed five games with knee injury in 1977, but rebounded with superior 1978 campaign . . .Played in six AFC title games, Super Bowls IX, X, XIII, XIV . . . Batted down three Fran Tarkenton passes in Super Bowl IX; sacked Roger Staubach three times in Super Bowl X . . . All-Pro twice, All-AFC five times . . . Born September 8, 1946, in Canton, Mississippi.

Russ Grimm

Guard . . . 6-3, 273 . . . Pittsburgh . . . 1981-1991 Washington Redskins . . . 11 seasons, 140 games . . . Selected in 3rd round (69th player overall) in 1981 NFL Draft . . . Originally pegged to play center, moved to left guard as rookie . . . Immediate starter on Redskins offensive line that earned nickname "The Hogs" . . . By second season gained much notice from around the league . . . Teaming with tackle Joe Jacoby, formed perhaps most punishing side of an offensive line in football at the time . . . With Grimm’s speed and strength, Redskins rode success of dominating running attack to victory in Super Bowl XVII in which John Riggins rushed for then-record 166 yards. . . During playoff run that year, team averaged 152 yards rushing . . . In 1983 Grimm was selected to first of four straight Pro Bowls . . . Also marked start of four consecutive years (1983-1986) of All-Pro recognition . . .  Also named All-NFC in each of those seasons . . . In 1987 moved to center and started five games before being sidelined until season finale with knee injury. . . Missed 11 games in 1988 with knee injury . . . Appeared in five NFC championship games and four Super Bowls including wins in Super Bowls XVII, XXII, XXVI . . . Elected to NFL's 1980s All-Decade Team . . . Born May 2, 1959 in Scottsdale, Pennsylvania. 

Claude Humphrey

Defensive End . . . 6-4, 252 . . . Tennessee State. . . 1968-1978 (inj. res. - 1975) Atlanta Falcons, 1979-1981 Philadelphia Eagles . . . 14 seasons, 171 games . . . Falcons’ first-round pick (3rd player overall) in 1968 draft . . . Recorded 11.5 sacks as rookie . . . Named National Football League Defensive Rookie of the Year, 1968. . . Credited with 122 career quarterback sacks . . . Highly effective pass rusher, led team in sacks nine of 13 seasons . . . Earned first-team All-Pro in 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1977 . . . Second-team All-NFL/All-Pro 1969, 1970, 1971, 1974, 1976, 1977 . . . Selected to play in six Pro Bowls . . . Missed just two games prior to season-ending knee injury in 1975 . . . Rebounded with career-best 15 sacks in 1976 and was named team Most Valuable Player . . . Traded to Eagles in 1979 for two fourth-round picks following a brief “retirement”. . . In 1980, team high 14.5 sacks helped Eagles advance to Super Bowl XV . . . Career stats include two interceptions, a fumble recovery for TD, and two safeties . . . Born June 29, 1944 at Memphis, Tennessee.

Michael Irvin

Wide Receiver . . . 6-2, 207 . . . Miami (FL). . . 1988-1999 Dallas Cowboys . . . Selected by Dallas in first round (11th player overall) of 1988 NFL Draft . . . 12 seasons, 159 games. . . Earned starting role as rookie, but injuries caused him to miss 12 games in first two seasons . . . His 20.4 yard per catch average during rookie year led NFC . . . Feared by opponents for his combination of speed, size, strength . . . In 1991, caught 93 passes for a league-leading 1,523 yards and 8 touchdowns . . . Consensus All-Pro that year and earned the first of five straight Pro Bowl trips . . . Recorded 1,000-yard seasons in all but one year from 1991 through 1998 . . . In 1995 recorded finest season with 111 receptions for 1,603 yards, recorded an NFL record eleven 100-yard games, and scored 10 touchdowns . . . Had seven receptions for 100 yards and two touchdowns in the Cowboys' 38-27 win over Packers in 1995 NFC Championship Game. . . Capped off year with five catches for 76 yards in Dallas ' 27-17 victory over Steelers in Super Bowl XXX . . . Accumulated 750 receptions for 11,904 yards, 65 TDs during career . . . A member of the NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1990s . . . Had 100 or more yards receiving in a game forty-seven times . . . Born March 5, 1966 in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida.

Bob Kuechenberg

Guard. . .6-2, 253. . .Notre Dame. . .1970-1984 Miami Dolphins (inj. res. - 1984). . .Selected by Philadelphia Eagles in 4th round (80th player overall) of 1969 AFL-NFL Draft. . .15 seasons, 196 games. . .Spent 1984 season on injured reserve. . .Released by both the Eagles and Atlanta Falcons. . .Played semi-pro football before signing as free agent with Miami Dolphins in 1970. . .Highly competitive and driven to succeed, played in more regular season games (196) than any other player in Dolphins history at the time of his retirement. . . Also only player to play in all 19 playoff games in franchise’s history at that time. . .A versatile player, spent time at tackle and center positions. . .In 1978 played eight games at guard and seven at tackle, earning Pro Bowl spot at guard and Sporting News All-AFC honors at tackle. . .In 1977 suffered a pair of fractures in back in August but returned to lineup after missing just two regular season starts. . .Named to six Pro Bowls (1975, 1976, 1978, 1979, 1983, 1984). . .All-Pro 1975, 1978; All-AFC 1974, 1975, 1978; All-Pro Second Team 1975, 1977, 1978. . .Had memorable performance in Super Bowl VII victory. . .Born October 14, 1947 in Gary, Indiana.  

Dan Marino

Quarterback . . . 6-4, 218. . . Pittsburgh. . . 1983-1999 Miami Dolphins. . . 17 seasons, 242 games. . . Selected in first round (27th player overall) of 1983 NFL Draft. . . Earned starting role early in rookie season. . . As a rookie guided the Dolphins to 12-4 record and AFC East title and earned Rookie of the Year honors. . . Also named to first of nine Pro Bowls. . . In 1984 led Dolphins to 14-2 record and division crown. . .  Became first player ever to pass for 5,000 yards in single season (5,084). . . His 48 touchdown passes in a season obliterated the previous NFL record (36). . . By season's end, set six league records and named NFL's Most Valuable Player. . . In 1984 AFC Championship Game passed for 421 yards and four touchdowns in 45-28 win over Steelers, earning first and only trip to a Super Bowl. . . A prolific passer, by end of the 1995 season had supplanted Fran Tarkenton as the career passing leader in attempts, completions, yards, and touchdowns. . . Career totals are staggering; completing 4,967 of 8,358 passes for 61,343 yards, and 420 touchdowns. . . Thirteen times passed for 3,000 yards in a season, including six seasons he reached the 4,000-yard plateau. . . Passed for 300 yards in a game 63 times and threw for 400 yards in a game 13 times . . . Named first or second team All-Pro eight times and All-AFC six times. . . Born September 15, 1961 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Art Monk

Wide Receiver. . .6-3, 210. . .Syracuse. . .1980-1993 Washington Redskins, 1994 New York Jets, 1995 Philadelphia Eagles. . .16 seasons, 224 games. . .Selected by Washington in first round (18th player overall) of 1980 NFL Draft. . .Prototype for today’s bigger, stronger receivers. . .Caught 58 passes as a rookie and was unanimous All-Rookie choice. . .Had 50 or more receptions in a season nine times. . .Gained 1,000 or more receiving yards in a season five times. . .Set then-NFL records for catches in a season (106), most consecutive games with at least one reception (164), and career receptions (820). . .Finished career with 940 catches. . . Had finest season in 1984, catching eight or more passes in six games, five games of 100-plus receiving yards, and in one game caught 10 passes for 200 yards. . .Named Redskins 1984 Most Valuable Player. . .First Redskin to produce three consecutive 1,000 receiving yard seasons. . .A three-time Pro Bowl selection, was All-Pro choice in 1984 and 1985. . .First- or second-team All-NFC three times. . .Born December 5, 1957 in White Plains, New York

  Fritz Pollard

Halfback/Coach. . . 5-9, 165 . . . Bates, Brown . . . 1919-1921, 1925-1926 Akron Pros/Indians, 1922 Milwaukee Badgers, 1923-1924 Gilberton Cadamounts (independent pro team) 1923, 1925 Hammond Pros, 1925 Providence Steam Roller . . . 8 seasons . . . All-America halfback from Brown. . . A pro football pioneer. . . Began career in 1919 with Akron (OH) Pros. . . . In 1920, Pros joined newly founded American Professional Football Association, later renamed the National Football League . . . With Pollard leading the charge, Pros went undefeated (8-0-3) to win NFL's first crown. . . As member of new league, Pollard immediately earned place in pro football history as one of just two African Americans in the NFL. . . In 1921 earned another distinction as first African American head coach in NFL when Pros named him co-coach. . . An exciting, elusive runner was most feared back in fledgling league. . . During his NFL career played and sometimes coached four different teams, Akron (1920-21/1925-26), Milwaukee (1922), Hammond (1923, 1925), and Providence (1925). . . Also played for Gilberton Cadamounts, strong independent pro team in Pennsylvania “Coal League” (1923-1924). . . After playing career, organized and coached all-black independent pro team, Chicago Black Hawks, 1928-1932 . . . Born January 27, 1894 in Chicago, Illinois. . . Died May 11, 1986.    

Derrick Thomas

Linebacker. . . 6-3, 243. . . Alabama. . . 1989-1999 Kansas City Chiefs. . . 11 seasons, 169 games. . . Selected in the first round (4th player overall) in 1989 NFL Draft. . . Consensus All-America. . . Amassed 10 sacks and 75 tackles to earn Defensive Rookie of the Year honors . . . In 1990 recorded league-leading and team record 20 sacks; including NFL record seven sacks in game vs. Seahawks . . . Also recorded six forced fumbles, two fumble recoveries, 63 tackles, five pass deflections, 35 quarterback pressures and was named to first of nine Pro Bowls. . . No player amassed more sacks during 1990s than 116.5 by Thomas . . . e He HFinished career with 126.5 sacks; fourth highest total by linebacker in NFL history . . . Had 10 or more sacks in a season seven times; recorded multi-sack games 27 times. . . Forced 45 fumbles, had 19 fumble recoveries, scored four touchdowns on fumble returns and added three safeties during career . . . Lone interception came in final season. . . Member of NFL's All-Decade Team of the 1990s. . .All-NFL three times. . .Named first-team All-AFC seven times during eight-year stretch (1989-1996). . . In 11 years Thomas anchored defense, Chiefs finished first or second in AFC West ten times, made seven playoff appearances, won three division titles. . . Born January 1, 1967 in Miami, Florida. . . Died February 8, 2000.

Roger Wehrli

Cornerback . . . 6-0, 190 . . . Missouri . . . 1969-1982 St. Louis Cardinals . . . 14 seasons, 193 games . . . Selected in first round (19th player overall) in 1969 NFL Draft . . . Starter as rookie recording three interceptions and leading team in punt returns. . . In 1970 picked off career-high six passes (a feat he matched in 1975) to earn first All-Pro, All-NFC, and Pro Bowls honors . . . Led or tied for lead in interceptions for Cardinals four times during. . . Maintained enough speed and savvy to play demanding position for 14 seasons . . . Registered interception in all but two seasons and amassed 40 career interceptions – two for touchdowns . . . From 1974 to 1976, picked off 12 passes as Cardinals put together string of three straight double-digit win seasons including back-to-back NFC East titles (1974, 1975) . . .  Intercepted three Roger Staubach passes during key 31-17 win over division rival Dallas, Dec. 7, 1975 . . . In 1981, was moved to left cornerback position . . . In first start on left side made four tackles and broke up two passes as Cardinals shutout Bills, 24-0 . . . Besides ability to cover receivers, had a knack for finding ball . .  Recovered franchise record-tying 19 fumbles during career . . . Named to NFL's All-Decade Team of 1970s, was first-team All-Pro choice five times (1970, 1974, 1975, 1976, and 1977) and All-NFC five times, and named to Pro Bowl seven times. . . Born November 26, 1947 in New Point, Missouri.

George Young

Contributor. . .Bucknell, Johns Hopkins, Loyola. . .1968-1974 Baltimore Colts, 1975-1978 Miami Dolphins, 1979-1997 New York Giants, 1998-2001 National Football League. . .Little All-America and All-East honors as a defensive tackle at Bucknell. . .General manager of Giants, rebuilt team by drafting key players such as Phil Simms and Lawrence Taylor. . .Hired Bill Parcells as head coach. . .During tenure, Giants earned eight playoff berths, and victories in Super Bowls XXI, XXV. . .Prior to Young’s arrival, Giants had not made playoffs since 1963. . .Was named NFL Executive of the Year unprecedented five times, 1984, 1986, 1990, 1993, 1997. . . Following 1997 season, joined NFL front office as executive vice president for football operations. . .Served as chairman of NFL Competition Committee. . . Prior to joining Giants was on staff of Baltimore Colts (1968-1974) as scout, offensive line coach, director of player personnel, offensive coordinator. . .With Miami Dolphins (1975-1978) was director of personnel and pro scouting. . .Born September 22, 1930 in Baltimore, Maryland. . .Died December 8, 2001.

Steve Young

Quarterback . . .6-2, 205 . . . Brigham Young . . . 1985-1986 Tampa Bay Buccaneers, 1987-1999 San Francisco 49ers . . .15 seasons, 169 games . . . Entered NFL in first round of 1984 supplemental draft after two seasons in USFL . . . Traded to 49ers in 1987. . . Initially served as backup quarterback . . . Saw limited action first four seasons with 49ers . . . Stepped into starting role in 1991 . . . Despite knee injury that forced him out of five games, passed for 2,517 yards and 17 touchdowns for league-high 101.8 passer rating –  first of four straight passing titles . . . Added two more passing titles in 1996, 1997 to tie him with legendary Sammy Baugh as only quarterbacks to win six NFL passing crowns. .  . In 1994, set then-record 112.8 passer rating, added seven rushing touchdowns. . . In NFC Championship Game, threw two touchdowns and rushed for one as 49ers downed Cowboys 38-28 . . . Passed for 325 yards and a Super Bowl record six touchdowns in 49-26 win over Chargers in Super Bowl XXIX . . .Was named Super Bowl MVP . . .  During his NFL career threw for 3,000-plus yards six times and 20 or more touchdown passes in a season five times, and posted a passer rating of 100 or higher six times . . . Rushed for 4,239 yards and 43 touchdowns . . . Named All-Pro four times, earned All-NFC honors three times, named to seven Pro Bowls and two-time league MVP. . . Born October 11, 1961 in Salt Lake City, Utah.

IF ELECTED . . . SPECIAL NOTES ON 2005 FINALISTS

THE ROSTER OF HALL OF FAME MEMBERS COULD INCREASE FOR 10 NFL TEAMS

The New York Giants have three finalists; the Miami Dolphins, and Washington Redskins have two finalists who spent all or a significant part of their careers with that team.  The Chicago Bears, Pittsburgh Steelers, Atlanta Falcons, Dallas Cowboys, Kansas City Chiefs, St. Louis Cardinals, and San Francisco 49ers are represented by one finalist who spent all or a significant part of the their careers with those teams.

If elected . . .

Harry Carson, Benny Friedman, and/or George Young would be the 17th, 18th and/or 19th member(s) of the New York Giants to be elected.  Red Badgro, Roosevelt Brown, Frank Gifford, Mel Hein, Sam Huff, Tuffy Leemans, Tim Mara, Wellington Mara, Steve Owen, Andy Robustelli, Ken Strong, Fran Tarkenton, Lawrence Taylor, Y.A. Tittle, Emlen Tunnell, and Arnie Weinmeister, preceded them.

Richard Dent would be the 27th longtime Chicago Bear to be added to the Hall of Fame honor roll.  Doug Atkins, George Blanda, Dick Butkus, George Connor, Mike Ditka, John “Paddy” Driscoll, Jim Finks, Dan Fortmann, Bill George, Harold “Red” Grange, George Hala Back to news